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Washington (AFP) — American warplanes have bombed Islamist militants in northern Iraq near the Mosul dam, the U.S. military’s Central Command said on Thursday.

“U.S. military forces continued to attack ISIL (Islamic State) terrorists in support of Iraqi Security Force operations, using fighter and attack aircraft to conduct six airstrikes in the vicinity of the Mosul Dam,” it said in a statement.

The air raids were carried out over the last 24 hours, a U.S. defense official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told AFP.

The air attacks come after President Barack Obama called for decisive international action against the “cancer” of jihadist extremism in Iraq and Syria.

The latest strikes destroyed or damaged three Humvee armored vehicles, another vehicle, and “multiple” homemade bomb “emplacements,” Central Command said.

The U.S. military has conducted 90 air strikes in Iraq since August 8, including the latest bombing raids. Of those 90 operations, 57 have been in support of Iraqi government forces near the Mosul dam, it said.

Obama approved the air raids amid rising alarm over the threat posed by the Islamist militants who have seized territory to the north and west of Baghdad.

AFP Photo/Ahmad Al-Rubaye

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