The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Washington (AFP) – The U.S. military has captured a key suspect linked to the deadly 2012 attack on an American consulate in Benghazi in a secret raid in Libya over the weekend, the Pentagon said Tuesday.

“I can confirm that on Sunday, June 15 the U.S. military — in cooperation with law enforcement personnel — captured Ahmed Abu Khatallah, a key figure in the attacks on US facilities in Benghazi, Libya, in September 2012,” spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby said.

There were no civilian casualties in the raid, which took place on Sunday, and the suspect was in U.S. custody at a “secure location outside of Libya,” Kirby said in a statement.

After similar raids, the United States has held suspects aboard naval ships before flying them to the United States to face legal charges.

Kirby said all U.S. troops and personnel taking part in the operation have “safely departed Libya.”

U.S. authorities had filed charges against Khatallah and others over the 2012 Benghazi attacks, which killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens.

Photo: Gianluigi Guercia via AFP

Want to keep up with news around the world? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

"Stop the Steal" protester

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

More than eight months after a mob of then-President Donald Trump's supporters stormed the Capitol building while the 2020 presidential election was being ratified, some media outlets hyped a follow-up rally at the Capitol. But in fact, the real action is happening elsewhere.

Keep reading... Show less

Steven Mnuchin

Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Former President Donald Trump's executive order requiring the U.S. Secret Service to continue guarding his children and key members within his administration comes with a hefty price tag: $1.7 million, according to the Washington Post.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}