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Washington (AFP) – The second U.S. health care worker infected with Ebola flew on a domestic airplane a day before her diagnosis, and health authorities said Wednesday they are seeking to interview 132 people on that flight.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control said the woman “exhibited no signs or symptoms of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew,” but the agency wants to speak with passengers anyway to determine if anyone is at risk.

“Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13,” the CDC said in a statement.

“Passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 should contact CDC at 1 800 CDC-INFO (1 800 232-4636).”

Ebola is transmitted by close contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person. It is not contagious until a patient begins to show symptoms such as fever, aches, vomiting or diarrhea.

The second case of US transmission of Ebola was announced by Dallas officials on Wednesday, and follows the diagnosis on Sunday of nurse Nina Pham.

Both health care workers were infected while caring for a Liberian man, Thomas Eric Duncan, who was infected in West Africa and diagnosed in Texas where he had flown to visit family.

AFP Photo/Jay Directo

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Photo by The White House

A Maryland anti-vaxxer is facing charges for threatening National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony Fauci over email-- going as far as to warn the face of America's COVID-19 response that he would be "hunted, captured, tortured and killed," among other things-- according to court documents that were unsealed on Tuesday.

According to the affidavit filed in support of a criminal complaint, Thomas Patrick Connally, Jr. committed two violations-- threatening a federal official and sending interstate communication containing a threat to harm, both of which are felonies.

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