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Former vice president Dick Cheney called the kettle black on Fox News Sunday, ripping into NSA leaker Edward Snowden for betraying the United States.

“I think he’s a traitor,” Cheney said of Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked classified information on government surveillance programs and is now said to be hiding out in Hong Kong. “I think he has committed crimes in effect by violating agreements given the position he had.”

If anyone should know about that, it’s Cheney, a man who could be arrested for war crimes practically anywhere in the world except here and the UK. “I think it’s one of the worst occasions in my memory of somebody with access to classified information doing enormous damage to the national security interests of the United States,” he continued, seemingly unaware of both the hyperbole and the irony.

Cheney is “suspicious because he went to China. That’s not a place where you would ordinarily want to go if you are interested in freedom, liberty and so forth.” he said. And then, suggesting that Snowden may indeed have been spying for the Chinese all this time, Darth Cheney hinted darkly, “It raises questions whether or not he had that kind of connection before he did this.”

Video is below, courtesy of Crooks and Liars:

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

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