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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“Simply stated,” then-vice president Dick Cheney said in a speech to the Veterans of Foreign Wars National Convention on August 26, 2002, “there is no doubt that Saddam Hussein now has weapons of mass destruction.”

More than a decade after the beginning of a war that took hundreds of thousands of lives including 4,804 American soldiers, Cheney is saying much the same thing — though no weapons of mass destruction were ever found in Iraq.

“What we gain and my concern was then and it remains today is that the biggest threat we face is the possibility of terrorist groups like al Qaeda equipped with weapons of mass destruction, with nukes, bugs or gas,” he told Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly on Monday night when asked if the war was worth it. “That was the threat after 9/11 and when we took down Saddam Hussein we eliminated Iraq as a potential source of that.”

Cheney is confident that his support for the Iraq invasion and the use of waterboarding to torture prisoners were the right moves. They have, however, resulted in him not being able to travel to areas hostile to such choices, such as Canada.

In 2012, a poll showed that a majority of Republicans still believed that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.

Cheney on O'Reilly

 

Screenshot via The O’Reilly Factor

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

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