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The inventive and indefatigable Edward Klein, author of many works of purported non-fiction, is back in bookstores with Blood Feud: The Clintons vs. the Obamas.

In his latest work, the former Newsweek journalist recounts supposedly verbatim conversations between Bill and Hillary Clinton about Benghazi, and between Bill Clinton and his “friends” reviling President Obama. He also quotes, at length, a bitter argument over dinner in the White House between the former president and the current president. And he claims to prove that Hillary Clinton is concealing secrets about her own severe ill health and that she considered resigning in protest against the Benghazi “coverup.”

But Klein’s incredible scoops, faithfully promoted by various Murdoch outlets, deserve to be considered in light of his past record – which indicates a high likelihood of fraud. In 2005, he published The Truth About Hillary, an error-filled volume that claimed Chelsea Clinton was conceived when Bill Clinton “raped” Hillary, who Klein says is actually a secret lesbian. That book was bad enough to offend Sean Hannity.

For a sense of Klein’s commitment to accuracy and fairness, The National Memo is pleased to present a three-part interview with Klein by Al Franken and Joe Conason on Air America Radio’s Al Franken Show when The Truth About Hillary was published (hat tip to Newshounds for the transcript), which was also simulcast on TV’s Sundance Channel.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Screenshot: PJ Media/YouTube; Videos: AllisonBookworm/YouTube

 

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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