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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

On Monday night’s edition of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart called Republicans out on their hypocrisy after they pounced on Joe Biden’s “chains” gaffe and accused Obama of running a hateful and divisive campaign. Stewart admits that yes, the chains comment was bad, but he reminds the audience of Biden’s history of cringeworthy slip-ups, including telling “a man in a wheelchair to stand up for what he believes in.”

He then shifts to a montage of the predictable Republican outrage, ending with Romney telling Obama to take his “campaign of division and anger and hate back to Chicago.”

“As a general rule,” Stewart begins, “I find it helpful to not frame a plea for national unity by insulting a major city within that nation.”

He also points out that the right wing is no stranger to divisive rhetoric — not that anyone told Sarah Palin. He shows the former vice presidential candidate arguing that not a single prominent Republican spews rhetoric such as the “Harry Reids” and the “Nancy Pelosis.” Cue the Sarah Palin montage which includes her calling Nancy Pelosi a “dingbat.”

Aren’t we supposed to be talking about “big ideas” by now?

 

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Michigan militia members at state capitol

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although Twitter and Facebook have been cracking down on some far-right users, extremists have found other ways to communicate — including the smartphone app Zello, which according to the Guardian, was useful to some far-right militia members during the siege of the U.S. Capitol Building last week.

"Zello has avoided proactive content moderation thus far," Guardian reporters Micah Loewinger and Hampton Stall explain. "Most coverage about Zello, which claims to have 150 million users on its free and premium platforms, has focused on its use by the Cajun Navy groups that send boats to save flood victims and grassroots organizing in Venezuela. However, the app is also home to hundreds of far-right channels, which appear to violate its policy prohibiting groups that espouse 'violent ideologies.'"

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