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Mitt and Ann Romney were back in the media this week, reminding America just exactly who Mitt and Ann Romney are.

On CNN, the former GOP presidential nominee said he wished Hurricane Sandy never happened — because it gave President Obama the chance to look presidential. Of course, there were a lot of other reasons to wish Sandy didn’t happen — including 125 deaths and about $62 billion in damage. But Mitt has his own problems.

However, Ann Romney assures us that the couple who thought they would be living in the White House right now are done with grieving their loss. And she’s often been joined in the grieving process by people who burst into tears when they see her.

“It just happened yesterday, again,” she said. “It’s happening less and less when people see me and start to cry.”

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

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Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

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In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

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