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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Some are calling the income inequality address President Obama gave on Wednesday “the best speech he’s ever given about the economy” and “historic.”

Rush Limbaugh had a different reaction.

“This is the president citing the Pope, his new best friend, because the Pope is ripping America, the Pope is ripping capitalism,” he said, referencing the president’s quotation of a question from the Pope’s recent Evangelii Gaudium (Joy of the Gospel): “How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points?”

The right-wing host/thought leader went on, “And Obama’s having an orgasm.”

Rush continued, spouting a list of words that make right-wingers angry, including Jeremiah Wright, fairness and Benghazi.

Pope Francis has become a such a frequent target for Limbaughand some Tea Partiers—in the past few weeks that Bishop James D. Conley felt the need to pen a defense of the pontiff in the right-wing National Review.

Now former MSNBC host Martin Bashir has resigned, after conservatives protested his comments about Sarah Palin, even after he offered sincere apologies. But the British journalist lacked any political base to protect him.

Limbaugh did eventually apologize to then-law student Sandra Fluke after he launched an attack on her testimony for the Affordable Care Act’s birth control mandate.

But chances are he will never have to apologize for his comments about the Holy See. And Republicans who criticize Rush may end up apologizing to him.

Rush Limbaugh

 

Image: Media Matters

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Screenshot Youtube

Just over year before her untimely death on Friday, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared as a guest lecturer for the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, AR with National Public Radio correspondent Nina Totenberg. The crowd that signed up to see "Notorious RBG" live was so large that the event had to be moved to a major sports arena – and they weren't disappointed by the wide-ranging, hour-long interview.

Witty, charming, brilliant, principled, Ginsburg represented the very best of American liberalism and modern feminism. Listen to her and you'll feel even more deeply what former President Bill Clinton says in his poignant introduction: "Only one of us in this room appointed her…but all of us hope that she will stay on that court forever."