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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Republicans spent years demanding that the Senate pass a budget. Earlier this year they did, and now a handful of Tea Party senators — including Ted Cruz (R-TX), Mike Lee (R-UT) and Rand Paul (R-KY) — are preventing the Senate from doing what it should do next, go into conference with the House to come up with a budget. They’re afraid that if an actual budget comes out of that conference, it could be passed with a simple majority vote.

Basically, they’re demanding that 60-vote supermajority Senate Republicans decided to create when President Obama was elected, to make it more likely that American default on its debt — a disaster that would would make 2008’s financial crisis seem like a bad weekend in Vegas.

Why are these Republicans so scared? Cruz explained today: He doesn’t trust his fellow Republicans.

But he should really be more worried about his buddy Senator Paul who keeps using bad math, even though he’s been corrected.

Paul and Cruz have earned the ire of John McCain (R-AZ) before. You may remember he called them “wacko birds.”

But yesterday, McCain felt the need to explain to these senators how Congress worked before the Tea Party decided sabotage was a strategy.

Of course, the best irony of all is there would likely be no “wacko birds” in the Senate today if John McCain hadn’t made their hero Sarah Palin his VP choice.

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

Photo by Master Sgt. William Buchanan / U.S. Air National Guard (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

On June 22, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law a Republican-sponsored bill that calls for standards of "intellectual diversity" to be enforced on college campuses in the Sunshine State. But the Miami Herald''s editorial board, in a scathing editorial published on June 24, emphasizes that the law isn't about promoting free thought at colleges and universities but rather, is an effort to bully and intimidate political viewpoints that DeSantis and his Republican allies in the Florida Legislature disagree with.

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