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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

 

In an angry, rage-fueled opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh publicly melted down as he tried, and failed, to defend himself against multiple, credible allegations of sexual assault.

When he wasn’t crying or shaking with anger, Kavanaugh was raging about how unfair life is, spouting conspiracy theories about the accusations against him, and hurling unhinged attacks against Democrats.

“This confirmation process has become a national disgrace,” Kavanaugh said in a shrill and raised voice. “The Constitution gives the Senate an important role in the confirmation process. But you have replaced ‘advice and consent’ with ‘search and destroy.’”

Directing his comments at Democrats, Kavanaugh angrily added, “Since my nomination in July, there’s been a frenzy on the left to come up with something, anything to block my confirmation.”

“You sowed the wind,” he told the Democratic senators in the room, “the country will reap the whirlwind.”

Throughout his statement, which deviated from the written statement released Wednesday, he leaned heavily on the calendar defense, presenting his own handwritten notes on a calendar from three decades ago as some sort of “proof” that he couldn’t have possibly engaged in the behavior he’s accused of — even though it actually shows just the opposite.

At one point, he even referred to the most recent accusations against him by Julie Swetnick as “a joke and a farce.”

If there were any questions that Kavanaugh had an aggressive and belligerent side as described by his classmates, he answered those questions with his own behavior Thursday.

His remarks were a disgraceful display of privilege and partisan fury, reflecting his belief that he — not the women who have been publicly demeaned, smeared, and threatened for coming forward — is real victim in all of this.

But Kavanaugh knew he was performing for an audience for one — the admitted sexual predator who nominated him — and for that one man, his unhinged rant fit the bill.

For the rest of the country? Not so much.

Watch for yourself.


 

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

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