The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

Donald Trump referred to journalists reporting on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic as "dumb bastards" during a campaign rally in Arizona on Monday.

"They're getting tired of the pandemic, aren't they? Getting tired of the pandemic. You turn on CNN, that's all they cover," said Trump, pointing to the press at the back of the crowd. "You know why? They're trying to talk everybody out of voting. People aren't buying it, CNN, you dumb bastards. They're not buying it."


More than 219,770 Americans have died from the virus so far, and the death toll continues to rise by the hundreds every day.

Trump's mismanagement of the crisis has only contributed to the death toll, experts say, and polling has shown that the public does not trust him to handle the issue.


From an Oct. 19 Trump campaign rally:

DONALD TRUMP: Your state is doing great, you have a great governor as you know, and your state is doing great with the pandemic.
Pandemic. They're getting tired of the pandemic, aren't they? Getting tired of the pandemic. You turn on CNN, that's all they cover. COVID, COVID, pandemic, COVID, COVID, COVID, COVID.
You know why? They're trying to talk everybody out of voting. People aren't buying it, CNN, you dumb bastards. They're not buying it.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss

YouTube Screenshot

Just who deserves protection in America?

If you observe the folks this country chooses to protect and chooses to ignore, you may get an answer that doesn’t exactly line up with America’s ideals.

Keep reading... Show less
YouTube Screenshot

The First Amendment reflects a principled but shrewd attitude toward religion, which can be summarized: Government should keep its big fat nose out of matters of faith. The current Supreme Court, however, is not in full agreement with that proposition. It is in half agreement — and half is not enough.

This section of the Bill of Rights contains two commands. First, the government can't do anything "respecting an establishment of religion" — that is, sponsoring, subsidizing or providing special favors for religious institutions or individuals.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}