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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

On Monday, President Donald Trump insisted on Twitter that there was no “turmoil” in the White House and that any suggestion otherwise was just more misinformation from the “Dishonest Media.”

And then on Tuesday, that internal chaos of the administration poured out into public.

It began, as it so often does, with a Trump tweet. He revealed that National Security Adviser John Bolton, a controversial figure for decades, is no longer a part of the administration:

Many were cheered by this announcement, given that Bolton is a fierce warmonger who never should have been hired by any president. But was Trump’s claim even true? Bolton countered the president’s narrative almost immediately:

But it didn’t end there. Not content to just let the two competing stories run, Bolton began apparently began text every member of the media he could think of. He texted Fox News, Washington Post reporter Robert Costa, and the Daily Beast.

“Let’s be clear, I resigned, having offered to do so last night,” he told Costa. “I will have my say in due course. But I have given you the facts on the resignation. My sole concern is US national security.”

Despite Trump’s claim that the decision was made Monday night, the White House sent out a schedule to reporters at 10:55 a.m. — just about an hour before Trump’s tweet about Bolton — which said that the national security adviser would be appearing alongside the secretary of State and the Treasury secretary to brief the press on Tuesday afternoon.

So, let’s review: Trump claimed there was no “turmoil” in the White House. Then he announced that he was firing his national security adviser — the third person to hold the position in as many years — because his views clash so drastically with him and others in the administration. That firing, however, seemed not to be planned out, because the White House had said Bolton would be performing official duties about an hour before the tweet. Bolton directly contradicted the president after the tweet, clearly insulted, and went to multiple media outlets to deliver an alternative version of events. He even promised that he has more information to provide in “due course.”

Does this sounds like a White House that is, as Trump himself once described it, a “well-oiled machine”?

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Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump, who still hasn't conceded that he lost the election, will soon be leaving the White House. On his way out, he's not participating in any of the traditional hand-off rituals that incumbents typically do to welcome newly elected Presidents (like leaving a farewell letter of advice to the new president or having a one-on-one conversation with them).

Trump also apparently wants his departure to involve "a military-style sendoff and a crowd of supporters" at either the White House, the Joint Base Andrews or his final destination, the Palm Beach International Airport, according to CNN.

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