Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.
Thursday, December 8, 2016

Federal Court Strikes Down Texas’ Voter Suppression Law

Federal Court Strikes Down Texas’ Voter Suppression Law

Following on the U.S. Dept. of Justice finding last March that the Republican-enacted polling place Photo ID restriction law in Texas was discriminatory, in violation of the U.S. Voting Rights Act (VRA), a three-judge U.S. District Court panel has again blocked the law from being implemented.

The decision by the federal panel, which included one judge appointed by George W. Bush, was unanimous.

Texas had appealed the DoJ decision earlier this year, seeking a declaratory judgment from the court, after the federal agency had found the state had not met its “burden of showing that a submitted change [to an election law] has neither a discriminatory purpose nor a discriminatory effect,” under Section 5 of the VRA, which requires preclearance for new election laws in 16 different U.S. jurisdictions with a history of racial discrimination. The Lone Star State is one of those jurisdictions.

The DoJ had determined that, based on the state’s own statistics, the law would have disproportionately disenfranchised registered Hispanic voters in the state. The found that registered Hispanics are anywhere from 46% to 120% more likely than non-Hispanics to lack the type of state-issued Photo ID that would have now been required to vote under the new law.

The 56-page ruling by the U.S. District court panel in D.C. today [PDF] found that “the law will almost certainly have retrogressive effect” as “it imposes strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor, and racial minorities in Texas [who] are disproportionately likely to live in poverty.”

“Crucially,” the court added, “the Texas legislature defeated several amendments that could have made this a far closer case” when they ignored warnings that the law “as written, would disenfranchise minorities and the poor.”

In Texas, as Democratic lawmakers had pointed out while the bill was being debated, some registered voters would have to travel as far as 150 miles round trip to receive their “free” ID, presuming they owned or were able to afford buy the underlying documentation required to obtain that “free” ID. The burden would be especially difficult for those without drivers licenses in the first place.

The court blasted both the Republican lawmakers and the attorneys who presented their case. “Everything Texas has submitted as affirmative evidence is unpersuasive, invalid, or both. Moreover, uncontested record evidence conclusively shows that the implicit costs of obtaining [Photo ID that would satisfy the new law] will fall most heavily on the poor and that a disproportionately high percentage of African Americans and Hispanics in Texas live in poverty. We therefore conclude that SB 14 is likely to lead to ‘retrogression in the position of racial minorities with respect to their effective exercise of the electoral franchise.'”

This was the second stinging loss for Texas Republicans in one week. On Monday, their plan for Congressional Redistricting in the state, on the heels of four new seats gained after the 2010 Census, was also struck down by a three-judge federal panel for violations of the VRA…

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2012 The National Memo