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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

In late June, the Republican Party unveiled its new donor portal WinRed. The GOP had high hopes for the website, insisting that it had the potential to seriously ramp up grassroots donations to Republican candidates. But according to a report by the Daily Beast’s Lachlan Markay, WinRed “has had what could charitably be described as a rocky launch.”

During its first week, Markay reports, WinRed raised “just $184,000.” However, he goes on to report that “operations have improved since then” at WinRed, according to its officials. One source told the Daily Beast that WinRed helped raise almost $4 million during the last four days of July, although the source doesn’t expect that pace to continue.

WinRed, Markay notes, was launched to compete with the Democratic fundraising/donor platform ActBlue, which brought in $250 million in campaign contributions during 2019’s second quarter.

Despite its “rocky launch,” Markay reports, WinRed is still “positioned to be the go-to outlet for the” GOP establishment. Some conservative groups have tried to build a competitor to WinRed, but the platform has enjoyed the support of top GOP committees and President Trump himself. Trump, in fact, tweeted his support for WinRed on June 24:

 

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Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

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