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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

I guess we don’t have to worry about that presidential election. Harold Camping, the Christian radio broadcaster who incorrectly predicted that the rapture would occur on May 21, has a new doomsday prediction for his followers.

Camping has been sending out messages on his radio website claiming that the world is “probably” going to end this Friday. He came up with the October 21 date after his original prediction of a May 21 apocalypse was proven false. Apparently Camping’s math was just off by 5 months.

It’s good that he only thinks that the rapture is “probably” occurring this time: His previous, erroneous prediction caused many of his supporters to quit their jobs and spend their life savings on publicizing the supposed end of days.

“The end is going to come very, very quietly probably within the next month… by October 21,” Camping said in a radio message. “Probably there will be no pain suffered by anyone because of their rebellion against God. … We can become more and more sure that they’ll quietly die and that will be the end of their story.”

Perhaps Michele Bachmann has cleared her schedule for this Friday. Although the Minnesota congresswoman has never endorsed any of Camping’s predictions, she does believe that “we are in the last days.”

Video of Camping’s rapture prediction is below:

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