The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Screenshot from Philip Crowther/ Twitter

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

In the late afternoon on Sunday, Donald Trump released a minute long video saying he was feeling better and "It's been a very interesting journey. I learned a lot about COVID. I learned it by really going to school. This is the REAL school. This isn't the 'let's read the book' school. And I get it. And I understand it. And it's a very interesting thing."

He also teased that he was going to go out and see his supporters who have gathered around Walter Reed Medical Center. A strange thing to say, but an even stranger thing to do for the administration that has spent the better part of the last 72 hours telling everyone how seriously Trump and his handlers take everybody's health. Trump then appeared in video in a long line of black SUVs, waving from a closed window.


An attending physician at Walter Reed Medical Center wrote on Twitter "That Presidential SUV is not only bulletproof, but hermetically sealed against chemical attack. The risk of COVID19 transmission inside is as high as it gets outside of medical procedures. The irresponsibility is astounding. My thoughts are with the Secret Service forced to play."

After his short drive around the block, Trump reportedly returned to his hospital space at Walter Reed. There are secret service in those vehicles and secret service that has to get moving throughout the medical facility to make sure this can happen. There have already been reports of Trump's Secret Service detail feeling "unsafe as a result of Trump's actions."

One thing is known for sure about Donald Trump's condition: he has COVID-19.




Here's that medical reminder.





Finally, there are heroes here.


Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

A deadly plague continues to rage across America, and neither vaccines nor face masks nor herd immunity can stop it. The epidemic of drug overdose deaths has taken more lives than COVID-19 and is more intractable. But the Biden administration is showing a welcome openness to a new strategy.

That approach is known broadly as "harm reduction." The idea is that drug abuse should be regarded as a public health problem, not a crime or a sin. Prohibiting and punishing drug use doesn't work. A better option is helping illicit users modify their behavior to reduce their risks.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}