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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Stephen Colbert thinks he knows why the White House executive budget features a two-trillion-dollar mathematical error. “There’s a simple explanation for how this happened: Donald Trump is an idiot. Or he’s lying.”

Reviewing the “logic” behind Trump’s budget math, Colbert notes that cutting rich people’s taxes is expected to “magically” increase revenues by two trillion bucks over ten years — and that budget director Mick Mulvaney then doubles the magic by counting that revenue twice. Magically, a two trillion dollars increase in tax revenues from economic growth when we cut rich people’s taxes…and then counts that revenue twice,

“That’s like robbing Peter to pay Paul,” he snarks, “but you’re paying Paul with a Blockbuster gift certificate…that doesn’t work any more.”

Trying to help Trump, Stephen offers a special introductory math problem — with an uplifting solution.

 

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A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

The Treasury Department's nine-page "2021 Sanctions Review" released on Monday makes vague recommendations for "calibrating sanctions to mitigate unintended economic, political, and humanitarian impact." Unfortunately, it offers few tangible policy suggestions on how to end the high humanitarian
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Mt.Rushmore

Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

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