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Monday, December 09, 2019

Debt Limit? GOP Representatives Who Oppose Federal Spending Owe Thousands In Credit Card Debt

Texas Rep. Blake Farenthold, like many of her fellow Republican freshmen, has argued that the government, like individuals, should avoid debt. In January, she released a statement arguing that the government debt was too high and “like the rest of America, the government needs to tighten its belt and work within its means.” Farenthold apparently has not taken her own advice, as financial disclosure forms reveal she owes between $45,000 and $150,000 in personal credit card debt. Steve Ellis, vice-president of anti-federal spending organization Taxpayers for Common Sense, draws the obvious conclusion about Farenthold and her fellow freshman Republicans in debt.

“If they’re responsible for their own personal finances, then they may have a mind-set to be frugal with the federal Treasury,” said Ellis. “But if they can’t keep their personal finances in order, then you have to wonder how they’re going to handle the federal budget.”

Perhaps as a result of this Republican hypocrisy, polls show that more voters would blame Republicans than Democrats if the government defaults on its debt. [Washington Post]

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