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Reporting on Donald Trump’s attitude toward undocumented immigrants of late has felt like a slow-motion car wreck: In the course of a week, he has managed to alienate his newly-famous “alt-right,” nativist base while at the same time failing to meaningfully reach out to anyone who might otherwise have been repulsed by his ideas.

A week ago, Trump indicated that he might have to “soften” his position on immigration — as it happens, telling voters for 15 months that you will employ a deportation force to eject 11 million people from the country is horribly unpopular.

But Trump’s “softening” has been anything but, as seen in interview Thursday night with Anderson Cooper. Trump emphasized that, within the first hour of his presidency, he would sign an order ejecting hundreds of thousands (or maybe millions) of people from the country. (President Obama has deported more people than any other president, at around 2.5 million over his two terms.)

And for undocumented immigrants with no crime to their name except for their immigration status?

Another flip-flop: undocumented immigrants will have to leave the country in order to begin a path to citizenship, apparently, a reversal from the Hannity town hall just a day ago. Then: “We’re going to see,” just a few seconds later.

Oh, and also: “Tunnel technology,” a novel term even for Trump. And another flip-flop

It reads like a strange triangulation between a rabidly anti-immigrant segment of his base, to whom Trump has been speaking almost exclusively for a year, and… most of the rest of the country, which supports a path to citizenship for immigrants without a criminal record.

Watch this space: Trump has created a tricky political problem for himself. “When you’re in a hole, stop digging,” the saying goes. Someone let Donald know!

Video: CNN.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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