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President Trump’s lawyers have discouraged 45 from taking an interview with Robert Mueller or the special counsel’s team, arguing that such testimony under oath could amount to a “perjury trap.” But despite any such warnings, Trump is demonstrably impetuous and reckless enough that it might still happen.

And what if someone else in the administration is even more careless and over-confident when it comes to perjury? It’s not who you might think.

Vice President Mike Pence appears to agree to a personal Mueller interrogation in this clip from Face the Nation, telling interviewer Margaret Brennan he would be “more than willing” to sit down with the special counsel.

Pence does go on to mention “outside counsel” who will “advise” him on the matter, leaving wiggle-room while showing that the VP is still a politician underneath his veneer of religion and patriotism.

Face your indignation.

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller

Photo by West Point - The U.S. Military Academy / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

After Special Counsel Robert Mueller concluded his investigation into ties between the Russian government and the Trump campaign, the big question still loomed: Was the president guilty of a serious crime?

Attorney General Bill Barr quickly took it upon himself to answer the question, explaining that the special counsel's work had failed to accuse Donald Trump of criminal acts, and he personally concluded that insufficient evidence existed for any charge. This announcement stunned and perplexed many observers while cheering the president's allies. The truth only became clear weeks later when the Mueller report was finally released: It laid out substantial evidence that Trump was guilty of many instances of obstruction of justice, but the report was written so as to avoid making this conclusion explicit. (Mueller also sent a letter to Barr arguing that his initial statements about the resolution of the case had been misleading.)

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