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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Trevor Noah is admittedly making ET a lot these days. It’s not as if he’s the only TV talk show host who’s been stellar over the past few weeks, John Oliver is killing it (in case there’s a living soul out there who hasn’t seen “Chlamydia in Norway,” here’s your chance)  and we’re looking forward to featuring Samantha Bee again soon.

But Trevor’s week-opening monologue is simply too good pass over. The Daily Show comic begins with the Red Hen incident, expressing mixed feelings while wiping the floor with anyone who feels sorry for Sarah Huckabee-Sanders. Soon, however, the topic turns to a story about White House staff complaining that they can’t find a date in Washington D.C. due to their politics.

The host’s “far-right” line is too good to spoil. But a swipe at Stephen Miller and some other, ahem, fine-looking hunks in the Trump administration is soon to follow. Trevor thinks something else is holding back that elusive dating-app success.

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Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

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