The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

A few weeks ago, The Washington Post published a history of Donald Trump’s use of fake names to plant stories about himself in the pages of tabloid magazines across the country.

The article highlighted one such call between Trump — going by the name “John Miller,” who said he was a representative of Trump’s — and Sue Carswell, a reporter at People magazine, in 1991. In it, Miller, who is obviously Trump, spends the call bragging about the number of celebrities who call wanting to date Trump, including Madonna, who “wanted to go out with him.”

The discovery of Trump’s fake names was good for a laugh in the newsroom: It wasn’t necessarily surprising that the tabloid star used to plant stories about himself, and common sense dictated that Trump would own up to the sophomoric PR strategy and move on.

But, of course, he didn’t. Trump maintained that he wasn’t the man behind John Miller — or John Barron, a name he used to intimidate a lawyer representing a group of unpaid, undocumented Polish workers Trump employed to build Trump Tower. For weeks, everyone affiliated with the Trump campaign had to lamely claim that they couldn’t quite tell whose voice that was in the recorded phone call. But certainly, they said, if Trump says it’s not him, then it’s not him.

Yesterday on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Trump did away with all the lies.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Tyler Matzek

So the World Series has come around again, evoking the usual mixed feelings. For one thing, I don't have a team this year, although I'll be pulling for Atlanta in honor of my friend Lauren, a serious Braves fan I pretty much talked into baseball when she was my student. As a sometime athlete and a serious reader with a taste for complex narratives, she was a natural.

Also, the Houston Astros cheated. Bigtime. Cunning and crude, the team's 2017 electronic sign-stealing, trashcan-banging scheme tipping hitters to incoming pitches could have been designed by Vladimir Putin. It wouldn't have bothered me if several Astros had been banished from baseball like Pete Rose, whose compulsive gambling hurt mainly himself.

Keep reading... Show less

Mark Meadows

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Legal experts including a Harvard professor and a top election and voting rights attorney are weighing in on Sunday night's bombshell report from Rolling Stone naming members of Congress and the Trump administration who were involved in the planning and organizing of the January 6 rally and/or "Trump's efforts to overturn his election loss," according to two of the planners of the "Stop the Steal" rally.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}