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Rep. Andy Biggs

Screenshot from Rep. Andy Biggs' Instagram.

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

An ethics complaint has been filed against three Republican members of Congress over their participation in events that led to the violent and deadly January 6 attempted coup at the U.S. Capitol.

Reps. Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, and Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs of Arizona are accused of "a seditious conspiracy to use force to prevent Congress from carrying out its constitutional and statutory duties to count the votes of the Electoral College," by the Campaign for Accountability, a government ethics watchdog founded by two former members of CREW.

If the House Ethics Office finds any or all of the three Republicans violated federal law, the group is asking for them to be expelled.

Cawthorn spoke at President Trump's January 6 rally (photo), barely hours before the armed insurrection.

"This crowd has some fight in it," Cawthorn told Trump's MAGA supporters. "The Democrats, with all the fraud they have done in this election, the Republicans hiding and not fighting, they are trying to silence your voice. Make no mistake about it, they do not want you to be heard."

North Carolina's WLOS reports that "despite his tweets urging 'millions of patriotic Americans stand for their country,' Cawthorn said he felt no culpability in what unfolded" the day of the attempted coup.

"I don't feel I had any responsibility for them attacking the Capitol," Cawthorn said.

Two days before the domestic terror attack he posted this:


Gosar and Biggs also bear significant responsibility, according to the lead organizer.

"Far-right activist Ali Alexander, who helped rally Trump's supporters ahead of Congress' electoral count, has claimed he planned a rally that preceded the riot with the support of Gosar and Biggs," The Hill reports, citing an article in The Washington Post.

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