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From growing up on a sharecropper’s farm to helping lead the civil rights movement and serving 13 terms in Congress, U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) has lived an iconic American life. Now Lewis, along with co-author Andrew Aydin and award-winning artist Nate Powell, is retelling his journey through an epic graphic novel trilogy: March.

In the following excerpt from Book One, the authors recount the aftermath of Lewis and his fellow activists’ arrests during the Nashville sit-ins of 1960.

You can purchase the book here.

March Book One Page 104

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March Book One Page 107

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If you enjoyed this excerpt, purchase the full book hereMarch: Book Two is set to publish in January 2015.

Reprinted from March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell with permission from Top Shelf Productions. Copyright © 2013.

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