The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Jenny Staletovich, The Miami Herald

MIAMI — The season’s first tropical depression blossomed into Tropical Storm Arthur on Tuesday as it slogged north along the coast of Central Florida.

The storm, with tropical force winds extending about 45 miles, was headed northwest at 2 mph and could strengthen into the season’s first Atlantic hurricane later Thursday when it reaches the Carolinas, said National Hurricane Center spokesman Dennis Feltgen.

Forecasters expect the storm to remain offshore as it continues north and turns to the east later Tuesday or Wednesday.

“We’re now urging folks on the coast to monitor the situation because a lot of people have beach plans for the holiday, so they need to be watching this real close,” Feltgen said.

The slow-moving storm triggered a tropical storm watch for the state’s east coast, from Fort Pierce to Flagler Beach.

As it trudges north, South Florida can expect even more rain from Arthur’s lingering tail, forecasters said. The wet system may dump one to three inches of rain along the east coast, with some spots receiving as much as five inches. The northwestern Bahamas could see two to four inches, with as much as six inches in some areas.

The rain that soaked the area Monday should continue Tuesday as winds from the east and west collide to spark more rain, said National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Ross. On Monday, parts of Miami Beach received as much as 3.5 inches. The Doral area also topped three inches, but Miami International Airport received less than two inches.

“It can really vary,” Ross said. “Two to four is not out of the question, but you can see higher amounts.”

Bands from the storm should continue to feed rain Tuesday and Wednesday, but by Thursday clouds are expected to clear out with the chance of rain dropping to about 20 percent, he said.

If Arthur strengthens to a hurricane, it will become the first storm in a season that forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration project to be slow. Just eight to 13 tropical storms are forecast, with three to six growing into hurricanes and two becoming major storms packing winds over 111 mph. On average, 12 named storms form, with six turning into hurricanes and three strengthening to major storms.

While no hurricanes have struck Florida in eight years, there have been near misses, including Dorian, which made a beeline for Florida last July before turning north.

Photo via NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

Interested in national news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Sen. Bernie Sanders, left, and President Joe Biden during 2020 presidential debate

I look at September 2019 as a month where I missed something. We began with a trip to New York to do Seth Meyers’s and Dr. Oz’s shows. Why would we go on The Dr. Oz Show? For the same reason we had gone on Joe Rogan’s podcast in August: We could reach a vast audience that wasn’t paying attention to the standard political media. On Dr. Oz, Bernie could talk about Medicare for All and his own physical fitness. While at the time we believed Bernie was uncommonly healthy for his age, he was still 78. Questions would be raised related to his age, and we needed to begin building up the case that he was completely healthy and fit. It turned out to be a spectacular interview, ending with the two of them playing basketball on a makeshift court in the studio. Bernie appeared to be on top of the world.

Yet in retrospect, I should have seen Bernie growing more fatigued. After New York, with the school year starting, we did a series of rallies at colleges and universities in Iowa; this was the kickoff of our campus organizing program in the state. We would then fly to Colorado for a large rally in Denver before heading to Boulder to prep for the third debate, to take place in Houston on September 12. In Iowa, Bernie’s voice was a little hoarse. After the rally in Denver, he had completely blown it out. He sounded terrible.

Keep reading... Show less

Rep. James Clyburn

When I interviewed House Majority Whip James Clyburn in 2014 about his memoir Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black, the South Carolina Democrat was confident in America’s ability to find its way, no matter how extreme the political swings might appear at any given time.

“The country from its inception is like the pendulum on a clock,” the congressman told me. “It goes back and forward. It tops out to the right and starts back to the left — it tops out to the left and starts back to the right.” And remember, he said, it “spends twice as much time in the center.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}