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CAIRO (AFP) – Egypt’s ministers of tourism, environment, communication and legal affairs tendered their resignations on Monday a day after massive protests against President Mohamed Morsi swept the country, a senior government official told AFP.

The four handed in their letters of resignation together to Prime Minister Hisham Qandil, the official said.

Tourism minister Hisham Zazou had already tried to resign last month after Morsi appointed Adel al-Khayat, a member of an Islamist party linked to a massacre of tourists in Luxor, as governor of the temple city.

The Islamist president on June 16 named Khayat along with 16 other new governors, including seven from his Muslim Brotherhood movement.

Khayat is a member of the political arm of ex-Islamic militant group Gamaa Islamiya, which claimed responsibility for the massacre of 58 tourists at Luxor in 1997.

But Zazou returned to work last week after Khayat quit.

Monday’s resignations come amid a campaign of civil disobedience and a day after massive nationwide protests against Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood.

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Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

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