The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Georgia GOP congressional candidate Marjorie Taylor Greene

Screenshot

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

Donald Trump's "future Republican star," QAnon adherent Marjorie Taylor Greene, who got a special invitation, posted a direct threat to sitting members of Congress on Facebook. She posted a photo of herself on Thursday, holding a rifle next to a composite picture of Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Ilhan Omar captioned: "Squad's Worst Nightmare."


It's hard to read that as anything but a violent and direct threat to the lawmakers, a threat that needs to be taken very seriously, as David Waldman has pointed out. If she wins election and is not barred from being seated by Congress, she'll have free access to every part of the Capitol and all the congressional office buildings without having to go through security. She could, theoretically, officially, bring that rifle onto the House floor. She's not just a QAnon kook, she's a clear danger.

She posted text with the photo: "Hate America leftists want to take this country down … We need strong conservative Christians to go on the offense against these socialists who want to rip our country apart. … SAVE AMERICA. STOP SOCIALISM. DEFEAT THE DEMOCRATS!" As of 11:00 ET Friday morning, it was still up. Which is a whole other problem.


images.dailykos.com

Saturday, Sep 5, 2020 · 12:54:40 AM PST · Joan McCarter

Facebook's spokesperson confirms in a tweet responding to Rep. Omar that the image has been removed from Facebook.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

Keep reading... Show less
x

Close