The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

On Friday, President Donald Trump held a rally in Lebanon, Ohio, where he urged his supporters to vote for Rep. Steve Chabot’s re-election.

Having said his piece on that, however, he took a turn into very strange territory, and ended up ranting about the greatness of both Union general Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate general Robert E. Lee.

“[Ohio] also gave you a general who was incredible,” Trump said. “He drank a little bit too much. You know who I’m talking about, right? So Robert E. Lee was a great general. And Abraham Lincoln developed a phobia. He couldn’t beat Robert E. Lee. He was going crazy, I don’t know if you know this story. But Robert E. Lee was winning battle after battle after battle, and Abraham Lincoln came home and said, ‘I can’t beat Robert E. Lee.’ And he had all of these generals. They looked great, they were the top of their class at West Point, they were the greatest people. There was only one problem. They didn’t know how the hell to win. They didn’t know how to fight. They didn’t know how.”

It seems as if Trump does not really know anything about the Civil War, as there was no substance in anything that he said in that speech. Regardless, it is not appropriate for an American president to proclaim the “greatness” of a man who betrayed his country and went to war against his fellow U.S. troops to preserve the institution of slavery.

Trump has repeatedly suggested a reverence for Lee and his fellow Confederate officers, blasting any and all efforts to remove Confederate monuments from public squares.

Matthew Chapman is a video game designer, science fiction author, and political reporter from Austin, TX. Follow him on Twitter @fawfulfan.

 

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Amazing to read that over 4 million Americans quit their jobs in September — part of a mass labor pullout being called the Great Resignation. The social and economic chaos unleashed by COVID-19 has apparently jumbled pre-pandemic assumptions.

Many of the job leavers have used the downtime time to re-imagine what they want out of life and are concluding that "work no longer fits into that picture," Barron's reports.

Keep reading... Show less

Rivian electric vehicles

The Biden administration, to its credit, never misses a chance to emphasize the importance of dealing with climate change. President Joe Biden calls it an "existential" threat to humanity. John Kerry, his special envoy on the issue, said in April: "That means life and death. And the question is, are we behaving as if it is? And the answer is no."

That was certainly true under former President Donald Trump, who championed coal, abandoned the 2015 Paris agreement on climate, and dismissed global warming as a hoax. Biden has brought a badly needed shift on policy. But his policies sometimes are at war with his rhetoric.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}