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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

The Department of Justice inspector general annihilated Donald Trump’s so-called “deep state” conspiracy theories on Wednesday, testifying that neither former President Barack Obama nor anyone in his administration spied on or ordered investigations of Trump’s 2016 campaign.

“Did you find any evidence that President Obama or anyone else in the White House asked the U.S. government to investigate then-candidate Trump or his campaign?” Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) asked IG Michael Horowitz at a hearing on Wednesday.

“We certainly didn’t see any evidence of that in the FBI’s files or the department’s files,” said Horowitz, who led the investigation into the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation — the results of which were published on Monday.

Horowitz was testifying about his report, which found no evidence that political bias impacted the investigations into Trump. The report instead found that the Trump-Russia investigation was legitimate, despite shortcomings within the FBI that required corrective measures.

Republicans, however, have rejected that conclusion and have continued to spread the baseless accusation that Trump was the victim of a politically biased probe.

Attorney General William Barr accused Obama earlier in the week of spying on Trump, ignoring what was laid out in Horowitz’s report.

Trump, for his part, has smeared members of his own administration — including FBI Director Christopher Wray — who refused to take part in the false conspiracy that Obama spied on the Trump campaign.

Trump attacked Wray on Tuesday, after Wray accurately concluded that the FBI did not unfairly target Trump.

“I don’t know what report current Director of the FBI Christopher Wray was reading, but it sure wasn’t the one given to me,” Trump tweeted. “With that kind of attitude, he will never be able to fix the FBI, which is badly broken despite having some of the greatest men & women working there!”

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

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