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Geneva (AFP) – Iran and world powers will meet in Geneva in “a few weeks” to continue negotiations over Tehran’s controversial nuclear drive, Iran’s foreign minister said Wednesday.

“The continuation of the negotiations will be in Geneva in a few weeks,” Mohammad Javad Zarif wrote on his Facebook page.

Iran, the United States and five other world powers revived stalled nuclear talks in Geneva on Tuesday, with Tehran laying out a road map to end the showdown over its nuclear ambitions.

Negotiators from the European Union-chaired P5+1 group on Wednesday pored over what Iran billed as a breakthrough proposal to end the decade-long standoff over its nuclear program.

“In the meantime, the P5+1 members will have the opportunity to [study] the details of Iran’s proposals and prepare actions they need to take,” Zarif said. “Negotiations and reaching a resolution is difficult, and negotiating over details requires time and great deliberation.”

Scant details of this week’s negotiations have been revealed, but all sides have stressed the changed tone in the Geneva talks, which come two months after Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, seen as a relative moderate, succeeded hardline Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

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