The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Alex Dobuzinskis and Piya Sinha-Roy

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Reality star Caitlyn Jenner’s offer to be a “trans ambassador” to U.S. Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz drew criticism on Friday from some members of the LGBT community, but major transgender rights organizations stayed out of the fray.

Jenner told gay and lesbian publication The Advocate in an interview posted this week that she admired Cruz despite the social conservative’s stance on transgender issues.

The 66-year-old Olympic gold medalist turned television personality called Cruz a “great constitutionalist” and said she would like to advise him on questions relating to her community.

“Yes, trans ambassador to the president of the United States, so we can say, ‘Ted, love what you’re doing but here’s what’s going on,'” Jenner, who last year became the most high-profile American to transition to a different gender, told The Advocate.

The muted reaction to Jenner’s support for Cruz appeared to show the high level of esteem she enjoys in the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. But that did not stop some of its members speaking out.

“Doing my best to not send tweets to a woman I respect for her courage, but dang it, @Caitlyn_Jenner you’re killing me with Cruz support!” Chely Wright, the first country music star to come out as gay, wrote in a post on Twitter.

Some in the LGBT community took a more pointed stand, citing Cruz’s opposition to same-sex marriage and his criticism of government efforts to allow students to use a bathroom that conforms to their gender identity.

In January, at a campaign stop in Iowa, Cruz said “inflicting” transgender students on teachers by allowing them to use a faculty restroom in line with their gender identity was better than having them share a bathroom with other students, according to video from NBC News.

Zack Ford, the LGBT editor at ThinkProgress, a website affiliated with the left-leaning Center for American Progress, wrote in a post that Jenner’s support for Republicans like Cruz taints her “credibility.”

Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, said Jenner’s comments highlight the fact a significant share of transgender people are Republicans.

“One would hope that transgender people would support philosophies that are helpful and not harmful to trans people,” she said, adding that Jenner might have taken that into consideration before offering her support to Cruz.

A representative for the gay rights group GLAAD declined to comment and a spokeswoman for Cruz could not be reached.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis and Piya Sinha-Roy; Editing by Andrew Hay)

Photo: Caitlyn Jenner arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Arizona Speaker Rusty Bowers

The scope of Donald Trump’s effort to subvert the 2020 election widened in Congressional testimony on Tuesday as Republican state legislators, state election officials, and local election workers described Trump’s pressure campaigns and bullying that targeted them and led to severe harassment for doing their jobs.

“There is nowhere I feel safe. Nowhere,” said Ruby Freeman, who, with her daughter, Wandrea “Shaye” Moss, were election workers at an Atlanta arena who were repeatedly named and smeared by Trump and his lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, for what the men falsely said was stealing Georgia votes for Joe Biden.

Keep reading... Show less

Wandra "Shaye" Moss

YouTube Screenshot

Wandrea “Shaye” Moss, a former Georgia election worker, testified today about the harassment and threats she received after she was targeted in a right-wing media-driven conspiracy theory about Democrats stealing the 2020 presidential election in the state. Moss spoke to the January 6 congressional committee today about the racist threats against her which followed the widespread coverage.

Moss said she wanted to work in election administration because her grandmother emphasized that voting was not always a right that Black people had in the United States. Due to the threats and harassment she received, she's been forced to leave her job.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}