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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Larry Wilmore took a look at the leaked video of Hillary Clinton meeting with Black Lives Matter activists, joined for this segment by The Nightly Show contributor Holly Walker and Clinton campaign “official” Carlos Jordanson.

Larry also sat down with two of those same Black Lives Matter activists, Daunasia Yancey and Julius Jones, and asked them: “People have talked a lot about your methods of disruption — that’s the word that’s being used out there. I just want to know: Why do you think it’s so important to make white people feel uncomfortable? Because that’s what they mean by ‘disruption.'”

Conan O’Brien saw the irony in Donald Trump’s immigration proposals: “It’s come out that Donald Trump is the grandson of German immigrants. Yes. But don’t worry — the last time a German guy with crazy hair who didn’t like foreigners took over a country, everything turned out fine!”

Seth Meyers also offered an interesting hypothesis: People aren’t actually going to vote for Donald Trump, but his support in polls is an expression of voter anger that will sort itself out once they’re actually in the booth. “So I’m just saying it’s fine, he’s not gonna win anything. It’s fine. You don’t have to listen to these polls — because that’s the just the liquor talking.”

And in other news, Jimmy Fallon looked at the “Pros and Cons” of Sesame Street moving to HBO.

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