Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

In the wake of the South Carolina primary, two topics dominated the late night shows: Donald Trump’s massive victory — and the final, definitive end of “Jeb!”

Trevor Noah reviewed all of Donald Trump’s antics on the way to winning South Carolina: “In one week alone, Donald Trump fought with the Pope, blamed George Bush for 9/11, and then he said he would stop terrorism by shooting Muslims with bullets dipped in pig’s blood. For real, this is what he said. And then finally, finally, last Saturday, South Carolina voters were like, ‘Stop! We’ve heard enough — you should be our president.”

Larry Wilmore bluntly diagnosed the reason why Jeb Bush failed so miserably as a presidential candidate: “Jeb’s blindness to his brother’s failure was the central problem in his campaign. He never realized his brother’s presidency was a disaster that Americans did not want to return to.”

Stephen Colbert said we’d have to get used to saying the words, “President Donald Trump” — but first he had to fight back a little nausea himself: “I think I just Trumped in my mouth a little.”

Conan O’Brien explained: “Analysts say that Donald Trump’s GOP rivals are running out of time to defeat him — that’s what they’re saying. This is not according to the electoral schedule — it’s according to the Book of Revelation.”

Seth Meyers asked why it is that Trump keeps changing his positions on issues like war and health care, but Republican voters keep flocking to him? The answer: He keeps saying racist and hateful stuff.

James Corden mourned the loss of Jeb Bush from the presidential race. “George W. Bush was a little confused why Jeb quit because he was losing — because as far as George W. Bush is concerned, you still become president even when you don’t get the most votes.”

Samantha Bee looked at the idea that John Kasich is somehow the “moderate” Republican candidate.

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


s3.amazonaws.com


Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.