The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

Simon & Schuster planned to publish a scathing tell-all book in late July by President Donald Trump's niece, Mary Trump. But Robert S. Trump, the president's younger brother, has tried to keep the book from being released — and on Tuesday, a New York judge temporarily halted its publication.

Robert Trump, according to CNN, alleges that Mary Trump's book, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man, violates a confidential agreement related to the estate of his father, the late Fred Trump, Sr. (who died in 1999). And Judge Hal B. Greenwald of the New York State Supreme Court blocked the release of the book — at least for now.


In an official statement, Robert Trump's attorney, Charles Harder, said, "Robert Trump is very pleased with the New York Supreme Court's injunction against Mary Trump and Simon & Schuster." Harder described the book as "reprehensible" and asserted that he will be "vigorously litigating this case."

But First Amendment attorney Ted Boutrous, who is representing Mary Trump and has represented CNN in the past, is arguing that Greenwald's order "flatly violates the First Amendment."

Boutrous announced, "We will immediately appeal. This book, which addresses matters of great public concern and importance about a sitting president in an election year, should not be suppressed even for one day."

Adam Rothberg, a Simon & Schuster spokesman, stated, "We plan to immediately appeal this decision to the Appellate Division, and look forward to prevailing in this case based on well-established precedents regarding prior restraint."

Mary Trump is the daughter of Robert and Donald Trump's older brother, Fred Trump, Jr., and the granddaughter of Fred Trump, Sr.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Mark Levin

Politico reported Friday that John Eastman, the disgraced ex-law professor who formulated many of former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election results, was also apparently in communication with Fox News host Mark Levin. The story gets even more interesting from there, revealing the shell game that right-wing media personalities engage in while doubling as political operatives.

A legal filing by Eastman’s attorneys reveals that, among the messages Eastman is still attempting to conceal from the House January 6 committee are 12 pieces of correspondence with an individual matching Levin’s description as “a radio talk show host, is also an attorney, former long-time President (and current board chairman) of a public interest law firm, and also a former fellow at The Claremont Institute.” Other details, including a sloppy attempt to redact an email address, also connect to Levin, who did not respond to Politico’s requests for comment.

Keep reading... Show less

Sen. Wendy Rogers

Youtube Screenshot

There have been powerful indicators of the full-bore radicalization of the Republican Party in the past year: the 100-plus extremist candidates it fielded this year, the apparent takeover of the party apparatus in Oregon, the appearance of Republican officials at white nationalist gatherings. All of those are mostly rough gauges or anecdotal evidence, however; it’s been difficult to get a clear picture of just how deeply the extremism has penetrated the party.

Using social media as a kind of proxy for their real-world outreach—a reasonable approach, since there are few politicians now who don’t use social media—the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights decided to get a clearer picture of the reach of extremist influences in official halls of power by examining how many elected officials participate in extremist Facebook groups. What it found was deeply troubling: 875 legislators in all 50 states, constituting nearly 22% of all elected GOP lawmakers, identified as participating members of extremist Facebook groups.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}