The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Grand Rapids (United States) (AFP) – Unbeaten U.S. fighter Floyd Mayweather hinted that the identity of his next foe, speculated to be Britain’s Amir Khan, could be revealed this week.

In a report Tuesday on the MLive Media Group website from Mayweather’s home state of Michigan, Mayweather was quoted as saying last week that this week could be a big one.

Asked about his fight future on November 27, Mayweather said, “Next week. I’m looking forward to next week. But as for me right now I’m not thinking about boxing.”

Mayweather, 45-0 with 26 knockouts, is expected to fight on May 3 of next year in his first bout since taking the World Boxing Council and World Boxing Association light middleweight titles in a 12-round majority decision over Saul “Canelo” Alvarez on September 14.

Khan became the top speculative candidate after he failed to sign a deal that appeared set to face American Devon Alexander this Saturday, the talk being that he did not want to risk a chance for a big-money fight with Mayweather by taking on Alexander first.

While both camps denied that was the case, the move meant Khan has fought only once this year, the fewest bouts of any year in his career. His last bout was a unanimous decision victory in April over Mexico’s Julio Diaz.

Asked about facing Filipino icon Manny Pacquiao, the fighter that boxing fans have wanted Mayweather to fight for several years, the 36-year-old champion only replied: “Who?”

AFP Photo/Al Bello

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

Keep reading... Show less
x

Close