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London (AFP) – British comedy veterans Monty Python are set to reunite for a new show in their first major collaboration in 30 years, member Terry Jones revealed on Tuesday.

“We’re getting together and putting on a show — it’s real,” Jones told the BBC.

“I’m quite excited about it. I hope it makes us a lot of money. I hope to be able to pay off my mortgage!”

The BBC reported that the new collaboration — the first major project since the 1983 film “Monty Python’s The Meaning Of Life” — would come in the form of a theater show.

Surviving Pythons John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Michael Palin and Jones — who are all in their seventies — are set to formally announce the new project at a press conference in London on Thursday.

The troupe won a cult following with their zany TV series “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” between 1969 and 1974.

They went on to make several hit films including “Monty Python And The Holy Grail” (1975) and “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” (1979).

The final “Meaning Of Life” film in 1983 was the last time the group appeared with their sixth member Graham Chapman, who died of cancer six years later.

The remaining Pythons have not appeared together since 1998 when they performed at the Aspen Comedy Festival in the United States.

But a spin-off musical “Spamalot”, based on the “Holy Grail” movie, has proved a hit on both Broadway and London’s West End over the last decade.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

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