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By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A doctor who treated an Ebola-stricken Liberian has fallen ill with the disease, the first confirmed domestic case in the megacity of Lagos, Nigeria, authorities said Monday.

Nigerian Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said the doctor had been treating Liberian Patrick Sawyer, 40, who flew to Lagos from Liberia on July 20 and fell ill while on the plane. He collapsed at the airport, was taken to a hospital and died in quarantine five days later.

An additional eight Nigerians are hospitalized under quarantine with suspected Ebola, and 61 more are under observation.

Six of those now in quarantine were initially placed under observation in the community, but were hospitalized over the weekend after exhibiting symptoms that may be those of Ebola.

There are fears Ebola could spread quickly throughout Nigeria if it takes hold in Lagos, one of the continent’s most crowded cities.

Ebola was first reported in the West African nation of Guinea in February, and swiftly spread to neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia.

More than 1,300 people have been infected and about 730 have died, according to World Health Organization figures released last week.

Of the fatal cases, at least 60 are doctors, nurses, and health workers.

AFP Photo/Zoom Dosso

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Among Americans who are not politically conservative, the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her pending replacement evoke anger and despair. A court with an impregnable 6-3 conservative majority is likely to roll back all sorts of rights and protections, leaving many people at risk.

The most obvious likely casualty is the court's 1973 decision granting constitutional protection to a woman's right to abortion. Four justices voted this year to allow a highly restrictive Louisiana law, and Donald Trump's next appointee is almost certain to provide the fifth and decisive vote for that option. Roe v. Wade has as much chance of surviving as a sandcastle in a tsunami. States, we can assume, will soon be free to ban most if not all abortions.

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