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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Mitt Romney knows that connecting with southern voters will be an uphill climb for him, as the region’s devoted conservatives mistrust his moderate record as Massachusetts governor. So to solve the problem, Romney is doing precisely what he’s done all campaign: shamelessly pandering.

Romney, who previously praised the height of Michigan’s trees and explained his love for Davy Crockett in Tennessee, has been telling Mississippi crowds that he loves grits.

Romney greeted the crowd at a town hall meeting Friday with a hearty “Morning, y’all!”

“I got started right this morning with a biscuit and some cheesy grits,” he said. “Delicious!

Romney later repeated the line, explaining that he’s becoming an “unofficial southerner:”

According to the most recent polls, Romney trails Newt Gingrich in Mississippi by 4 points.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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