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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“This Week In Health” offers some highlights from the world of health and wellness that you may have missed this week:

  • Fighting fire with fire? There’s been a promising development for treating skin cancer in virotherapy, in which viruses are reprogrammed to attack diseases. Researchers have had early success using a modified form of the herpes virus to treat skin cancer, even when the cancerous cells have spread throughout the body.
  • Obesity rates continue to soar across the country. According to a new survey, it may not simply be a matter of mitigating weight with diet and exercise. Obesity seems to be tied to larger issues, as the survey indicated high correlations between being overweight and a poor sense of well-being in other factors, including purpose, social, financial, community and physical.
  • No longer the stuff of science fiction, brain-controlled bionic limbs are not some near-future promise — they are already here. The hardware, which receives wirelessly transmitted signals from the brain, has already been introduced on a limited scale, and it’s only a matter of time.
  • An American traveling from Liberia to New Jersey died of what was later confirmed to be Lassa Fever, a viral hemorrhagic similar to Ebola, but not as deadly or contagious. It does not pose a major public risk, experts say.

Image from Mad Max: Fury Road

Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour

Three states that narrowly swung from Barack Obama in 2012 to Donald Trump in 2016 seem likely to swing back in 2020. Polling currently gives a consistent and solid lead to Democrat Joe Biden in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

Should Biden carry all three of these swing states and keep all of the states Hillary Clinton won in 2016, he will win an Electoral College majority and the presidency.

According to RealClear Politics' polling average, Biden currently enjoys a 4-point lead in Pennsylvania, a 6.4-point lead in Michigan, and a 6.7-point lead in Wisconsin.

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