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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The Senate Judiciary Committee has referred a former top Trump Dept. of Justice attorney to the Washington, D.C. Bar Association, requesting he be investigated for "compliance with applicable rules of professional conduct," according to Law & Crime.

The committee on Thursday released a bombshell 394-page report on Trump's final weeks in office, noting that former Acting Civil Division Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Bossert Clark "sought to involve DOJ in efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results and plotted with then President Trump to oust Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, who reportedly refused Trump's demands."

In another damning assertion, the committee's report adds: "After personally meeting with Trump, Jeffrey Bossert Clark pushed Rosen and Donoghue to assist Trump's election subversion scheme—and told Rosen he would decline Trump's potential offer to install him as Acting Attorney General if Rosen agreed to aid that scheme."

"More than two months after DOJ authorized him to testify without restriction, Clark still has not agreed to the Committee's request that he sit for a voluntary interview," today's report notes.

The Senate Judiciary's report can be accessed directly here, or via the committee's website here.

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