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Seth Meyers is an honest man, but he can speak the prevaricating lingo of the Republicans, also known as big lies. When HHS Secretary Tom Price or Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA) spin the latest version of the “health care bill,” Meyers translates those whoppers with ease. (Cassidy’s slippery defense of the Senate bill is especially shameful when we recall his grandstanding promise last month that the Obamacare replacement would have to meet the “Jimmy Kimmel test.”)

And when Kellyanne Conway tries to pretend the bill doesn’t include  $800 billion in Medicaid cuts — “We don’t see them as cuts” — the Late Night host can tell us exactly what she means. See, those cuts are just “reverse increases,” another category of “alternative facts.”

Finally, let’s not forget her boss, trolled so easily by Barack Obama into confessing, despite the usual White House denials, that he had called the House bill “mean.” I did it first! he brayed. The Trump team can’t keep up with their own lying lies.

As you read this, Trumpcare appears to be headed for ignominious defeat, but it isn’t dead yet. Every American should be taking “a closer look” at this lousy legislation — and its craven sponsors.

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Rep. Devin Nunes

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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From left Ethan Crumbley and his parents Jennifer and James Crumbley

Mug shot photos from Oakland County via Dallas Express

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Tightening the gun laws would seem a lot easier and less intrusive than psychoanalyzing everyone with access to a weapon. But to address Rogers' point following the recent mass murder at a suburban Detroit high school, the question might be, "How do we with target the adults who hand powerful firearms to children with mental illness?"

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