Statistical Analysis Shows Trump Is Lying More And Faster Than Ever

Statistical Analysis Shows Trump Is Lying More And Faster Than Ever

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

 

Trump’s lies are ramping up, according to a new analysis of his public statements.

Trump has always played fast and loose with reality, inventing stories and broadcasting them far and wide. But he is getting worse.

The Star newspaper did a detailed statistical analysis of Trump’s public statements and found that the rate of Trump’s lies has nearly doubled thus far this year.

The Star reported, “in 2017, Trump said about 26 words for every one false word. In 2018, it’s down to about 14 words per one false word.”

His number of average daily lies is now 5.1, up from 2.9 in 2017.

“He appears to have started ad-libbing more frequently in recent months than he did at the beginning of his term, when he was less comfortable,” the Star reports.

The report theorizes the more Trump relies on himself, rather than prepared statments, the more likely he is to lie.

And when he does lie, Trump will do it about virtually every topic under the sun.

He has repeatedly lied about his actions in the ongoing attempt to interfere in the FBI investigation of his campaign, including his decision to fire James Comey from his job as FBI director.

Trump has often lied about companies’ decisions to open plants so he can try to take credit and boost his economic track record.

Even his fellow conservatives have, on occasion, pointed out that his obsession with lying is getting in the way of the Republican agenda.

He has lied as a public figure for decades, and even with the deadly repercussions that a presidential lie can have compared to a reality TV star lying, it doesn’t faze him.

Even when it’s proved to put him or the GOP at a disadvantage, Trump hasn’t been able to rein it in. Lying is who Trump is.

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