The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019

Suspect In Fatal Shooting At Mississippi Campus Kills Himself

@reuters

(Reuters) – A man suspected of gunning down a Mississippi college professor in his campus office and of killing a woman died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after a day-long manhunt, authorities said on Tuesday.

Shannon Lamb, a social science instructor at Delta State University, killed himself after being cornered by Greenville police as they tried to initiate a traffic stop, Cleveland Police Chief Charles “Buster” Bingham told a news conference.

Lamb was being sought for the Monday killing of Ethan Schmidt, an assistant professor of American history at Delta State, and the earlier shooting of Amy Prentiss in Gautier, a town 300 miles (480 km) away, authorities have said.

Lamb and Prentiss shared a home.

The Cleveland, Mississippi killing of Schmidt followed similar incidents on U.S. college campuses in recent weeks, including at Sacramento City College in California, Texas Southern University and Georgia’s Savannah State University.

Law enforcement said when police stopped his car, Lamb jumped from the vehicle and ran. Officers who gave chase then heard a gunshot.

Bingham said motives were still being sought in both killings. “We don’t know why this man did what he did,” he said.

The shooting left students and staff at the school on edge for several hours as police locked down the campus and searched buildings following reports of active gunfire.

Delta State officials said no students were injured in the shooting in Jobe Hall, home to the university’s division of social sciences and history.

Delta State University President William LaForge said Lamb was teaching two courses during the fall semester and did not want a full load, citing medical issues.

He praised Schmidt as a “star” professor.

(Reporting by Victoria Cavaliere; Editing by Catherine Evans)

Photo: Shannon Lamb is shown in this handout photo provided by the Gautier Police Department in Jackson, Mississippi, September 14, 2015. (REUTERS/Gautier Police Department/Handout via Reuters)  

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

This is the first of what is sure to be way too many campaign columns to come. If you’d like them to land in your email inbox every time I write one, please buy a subscription.

Keep reading...Show less

Tape of home invasion attack on Nancy Pelosi's husband Paul Pelosi

Youtube Screenshot

Video released Friday of the harrowing home invasion and assault that nearly killed then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s husband in October brought little in the way of self-reflection or regret from far-right Internet trolls and Fox News stars who spent months baselessly insisting that the attack had actually resulted from a gay tryst gone wrong. Instead, the denizens of the right-wing conspiracy theory ecosystem either claimed that the new evidence proved that they were right all along, or used it to float additional conspiracy theories about why it hadn’t been released earlier.

The key facts were available within hours of the October 28, 2022, attack. Law enforcement swiftly alleged that David DePape broke into the Democratic leader’s home in the middle of the night seeking to harm her and pummeled her 82-year-old husband Paul, sending him to the hospital for emergency surgery. Journalists who reviewed DePape’s Internet history subsequently revealed that he had been radicalized online and espoused a wide array of right-wing conspiracy theories, including QAnon.

Keep reading...Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}