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Poll: Nearly One-Third Of GOP Voters Believe Trump Will Be ‘Reinstated’

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

Nearly one-third of Republicans believe Donald Trump will be likely be "reinstated" in office in August, a new Politico/Morning Consult poll released on Wednesday found — the latest lie the GOP base believes surrounding the 2020 election.

The poll found that an overwhelming majority of voters, or 72 percent, say it's "not likely at all" or "not very likely" that Trump will be reinstated. However, 17 percent of Republicans believe it's "very likely" that Trump will be reinstated, while another 12 percent believe reinstatement is "somewhat likely."

Trump himself has been telling advisers that he will be reinstated by August, according to a report from New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman confirmed by other outlets.

The lie appears to have emanated from the QAnon conspiracy theory world, which purports that the shambolic audit of the 2020 results underway in Arizona will prove that Trump actually won the state, and will start a domino effect as GOP lawmakers in other states push for similar audits.

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However, the Arizona audit will not overturn the state's 2020 presidential election results, according to which Biden carried it by more than 10,000 votes. Those results not only have already been certified, but also have been verified by three separate previous audits that found no fraud nor irregularities in the vote.

Experts say that the Arizona audit, being run by a Trump-supporting conspiracy theorist who pushed lies that the election was stolen, is being run so shoddily and by people who so desperately want to prove fraud exists that the results will be irrevocably tainted.

While the conspiracy theory appears to have started in QAnon circles, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says he believes he is the one who turned Trump on to the baseless idea of "reinstatement."

"If Trump is saying August, that is probably because he heard me say it," Lindell told the Daily Beast on June 2. Lindell is a vocal Trump supporter and conspiracy theorist who has lied about the election being stolen and advocated for Trump to invoke "martial law" to block Joe Biden from taking office.

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Sidney Powell, the ex-Trump campaign lawyer who is being sued for defamation over her voter fraud lies, repeated the reinstatement lie at a QAnon conference in late May.

"He can simply be reinstated ... a new inauguration date is set, and Biden is told to move out of the White House, and President Trump should be moved back in," Powell said at the conference.

The "reinstatement" lie is not the only one GOP voters believe.

Two-thirds of Republicans, or 67 percent, believe that Biden did not legitimately win the election, according to a CBS News poll from May.

And a PRRI-IFYC poll from May found that nearly 30 percent of Republicans believe the QAnon claim that "things have gotten so far off track" in the United States that "true American patriots may have to resort to violence."

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Emails Reveal Trump And Giuliani Pushed Arizona ‘Audit’

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Former President Donald Trump and his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani personally contacted Arizona's Republican state Senate President Karen Fann to urge her to move forward with the state's controversial election audit despite having no substantial evidence of voter fraud, emails show.

According to The Washington Post, hundreds of pages of email correspondence regarding the Maricopa County, Arizona audit were obtained by the government watchdog group American Oversight under the Freedom of Information Act. The emails, which reportedly include conversations between Trump, Giuliani, and Fann, also reveal details about the former president's push for the audit along with his praise of the Arizona state official for adhering to his request.

In fact, one email sent by Fann highlights where she indicated that she'd spoken with Giuliani a total of "at least 6 times over the past two weeks." She also noted that she'd personally spoken with the former president.

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"I have been in numerous conversations with Rudy Guiliani [sic] over the past weeks trying to get this done," Fann wrote an email on December 28. "I have the full support of him and a personal call from President Trump thanking us for pushing to prove any fraud."

In one email, Fann had also asked the former president for evidence of "rampant fraud" so a lawsuit could be filed to halt the certification of election results, but it appears that evidence was never provided.

"No suit has been filed nor was a suit filed to contest the certification process," Fann wrote. "I also want to get to the bottom of all this."

The emails also suggest Fann has spent a lot of her time doing damage control to placate her disgruntled constituents. On April, a woman named Rachel Griffin emailed Fann with questions about the impending audit as she delivered a stern ultimatum to lawmakers.

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"We are not going to be treated like idiots. We will make sure none of you are ever re-elected again unless you prove there was fraud," Griffin wrote. "It is no longer acceptable for all of you to pay lip service. We want results and we want them now."

American Oversight executive director Austin Evers has weighed in on the newly-obtained emails. According to the publication, Evers said the emails are "clear evidence that the goal of the audit was to erode trust in the voting process and to further legitimize Trump's "Big Lie."

"The more we learn, the more it becomes clear that this is not an audit, it's a sham partisan crusade carried out by some of the most cynical actors our democracy has ever known," Evers said in a statement. "With each new email, the paper trail confirms that the true goal of this process is to perpetuate Donald Trump's big lie of a stolen election and to undermine faith in our democracy."

Is Arizona Headed Toward Another Maricopa Election ‘Audit’? Maybe

Since its inception, the highly controversial ballot audit in Maricopa County, Ariz. has faced a number of hurdles that have ultimately contributed to it being weeks behind schedule.

From conspiracy theories to concerns about dark money from undisclosed donors, the audit has sparked numerous debates as Democratic lawmakers question its integrity. In fact, there are also concerns that all of the discrepancies could lead to inaccuracies in the audit results. So, what solution are Republican lawmakers considering to ensure this doesn't happen?

According to Arizona Central, the audit could be conducted for a second time. On Friday, the Republican-led Arizona state Senate came close to signing off on a second deal to conduct another recount. For the second audit, digitized images of ballots would be used as opposed to paper ballots.

Although the Florida-based firm Cyber Ninjas conducted the first audit, this time the county plans to employ the non-profit organization, Citizens Oversight. However, the organization is similar to Cyber Ninjas as it also has no known experience in ballot auditing prior to getting involved in former President Donald Trump's post-election legal battle.

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During an interview with the publication, Ray Lutz, the group's founder, disclosed details about the impending second audit as he shared details about his auditing technology, "AuditEngine."

"I think it is certainly a big test for me because I have put a lot of work on it for the last year and a half or so," Lutz said. "We have enhanced it to the point now where I believe we can do a lot to provide information about how well [this election] went."

However, he did later admit that "sometimes we see mistakes that are made, on our side."

"This is a new system that is valuable for the public to have and we can use for examining these elections and finding out what happened," Lutz said. He told the paper he would accept outside donations — but not from political organizations or "crazies."

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Senate audit liaison Ken Bennett promoted a different aspect of the audits as he insisted a second audit may be a good tool for comparison purposes.

Meanwhile, the audit being conducted by Cyber Ninjas reportedly "is not going well," according to Talking Points Memo. Last week, Jennifer Morrell, who served as an audit observer for Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs' (D) office, weighed in on the seemingly chaotic Cyber Ninjas audit. In a perspective piece published by The Washington Post, Morrell shed light on the disorganization and mismanagement of the audit.

"In more than a decade working on elections, audits, and recounts across the country, I've never seen one this mismanaged," wrote Morrell.

New Poll: Arizona Voters Reject 2020 Election ‘Audit’

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

A majority of likely voters in Arizona oppose the audit state Senate Republicans forced of some 2.1 million ballots cast in the state's 2020 presidential elections, according to a poll released Thursday by a GOP consulting firm in the state, a fact Republican analysts say could be problematic for the party in the coming midterm elections.

The poll found 55 percent of voters don't support the hand recount of some 2.1 million ballots in Maricopa County, the state's largest. Democrats overwhelmingly oppose it, but so do 68 percent of unaffiliated voters.

What's more, 44.5 percent of likely voters say they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who supported the audit, leading Chuck Coughlin, a Republican who is the president and CEO of the firm that conducted the poll, to say it proves the audit is a political liability for the GOP.

"While it is to be expected that they would receive significant opposition from Democrats, this audit makes them face headwinds among independent and unaffiliated voters as well," Coughlin said of the Republicans who forced the audit in the first place. "As we have said before, 'never run the last election, run the election you are in now.' This issue is an electoral cul-de-sac that spells trouble for Republicans in 2022."

The poll results come as bad news continues to plague the audit — which was forced by Republican state senators and is being run by a Donald Trump-supporting conspiracy theorist who was involved in a failed effort to overturn the election.

Election experts who witnessed the counting called the audit a mismanaged mess, condemning the conspiracy-fueled exercise as one meant simply to sow doubt in the election result rather than actually audit the vote.

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs said the audit's shoddy security protocols compromised millions of dollars worth of election equipment, and she advised Maricopa County election officials that they should purchase new machines.

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The Department of Justice said the entire audit may be in violation of federal election law, as ballots are not supposed to go to outside contractors this soon after an election.

In fact, even some GOP lawmakers in the state have come out to say the audit is an embarrassment that needs to stop, and that it makes Republicans look like "idiots."

Yet Republicans are pressing on in their quest to scrounge up evidence for Trump's voter fraud lies.

CNN interviewed state Senate President Karen Fann — whose lawsuit forced the audit in the first place — who stood by the audit despite the problems and continued to promote lies about dead people voting.

Two previous audits conducted in the state found no evidence of Fann's claims.

"There is no doubt that a mid-term 2022 turnout will lean more Republican, but the audit appears to mitigate advantages in this upcoming cycle that should otherwise be helpful to GOP candidates," Paul Bentz, another Republican consultant who works at the Arizona High Ground firm, said in a news release.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.