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Tag: e jean carroll

Trump May Soon Have To Answer Rape Allegations Under Oath

By Linda So (Reuters) - During a December visit to New York City, writer E. Jean Carroll says she went shopping with a fashion consultant to find the “best outfit” for one of the most important days of her life - when she’ll sit face-to-face with the man she accuses of raping her decades ago, former President Donald Trump. The author and journalist hopes that day will come this year. Her lawyers are seeking to depose Trump in a defamation lawsuit that Carroll filed against the former president in November 2019 after he denied her accusation that he raped her at a Manhattan department store in ...

Federal Judge Strikes Down Attempt To Delay Trump Rape Case

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The United States Department of Justice received a public rebuke from a federal judge on Wednesday.

At issue was a hearing about the DOJ's efforts to have taxpayer-funded lawyers defend President Donald Trump in a civil case over whether he defamed E. Jean Carroll after she accused him of sexual assault.

The DOJ attempted to delay the case after a government attorney was denied access to the courthouse due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.

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Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Barr Wields Federal Power To Protect Trump In Rape Defamation Case

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Attorney General Bill Barr's tenure at the Justice Department was further stained on Tuesday when officials announced in a court filing that the U.S. government will be defending President Donald Trump in a defamation case.

Trump is being sued by columnist E. Jean Carroll, who accused the president of raping her in the '90s. In his denial of the charge, Trump cast aspersions on Carroll and essentially branded her a liar, despite the fact that confidants of the columnist have come forward to say they were told of the assault contemporaneously. Carroll has taken legal action against Trump to hold him to account for his alleged defamation, and she seeks to have him deposed — a risky proposition for the president known for lying constantly.

But on Tuesday, Americans learned that their government's Justice Department is intervening in the case, claiming that the allegations implicate Trump in his official capacity as president. According to the filing, Barr delegated the authority to determine whether a federal employee's actions fall with the scope of their official duties to James G. Touhey, Jr., director of the torts branch. (Though it's hard to believe this kind of action doesn't happen in Barr's Justice Department without his at least implicit approval and support.)

The filing claimed:

[The] Department of Justice, certified that the defendant employee, President Trump, was acting
within the scope of his office or employment at the time of the incident out of which the claim
arose. The claim asserts defamation based on a written statement issued to the press and two
statements the President made in interviews in June 2019 in which the President vehemently
denied accusations made in Plaintiff's then-forthcoming book. The President explained that
these accusations were false and that the incident she alleged never happened. Acting pursuant
to 28 C.F.R. § 15.4(a), the Attorney General's delegate certified that President Trump was acting
within the scope of his office as President of the United States when he publicly denied as false
the allegations made by Plaintiff.

Because Trump was supposedly acting in his official capacity, the department argued, he cannot be sued as a private citizen. The filing says that if the judge accepts these claims, the case should be dismissed.

But many argued that the defense is absurd on its face.

"Hard to imagine a general counsel's office anywhere in corporate America would argue that an executive sneering 'she's not my type' about a woman who had accused the executive of rape was part of doing that executive's job, but that's what Bill Barr's DOJ is arguing," said legal analyst Luppe Luppen.

Slate journalist Mark Joseph Stern was even more scathing.

"Not sure if people outside the legal world are grasping what a shocking and profoundly disgusting move this is, an appalling and irredeemable debasement of the Justice Department, a direct threat to the very legitimacy of an agency that is responsible for enforcing federal law," he wrote on Twitter. "Barr stepping in to protect Trump from E. Jean Carroll is banana republican strong man shit of the most odious and corrosive kind. This crosses a rubicon."

CNN Legal Analyst Elie Honig said: "I can't remotely conceive how DOJ can argue with a straight face that it is somehow within the official duties of the president to deny a claim that he committed sexual assault years before he took office."

Overall, the effort seemed doomed to fail, unless the courts decide that nearly anything the president says is within his official duties.

But even if Trump can't prevail in court, the gambit gives him what he always wants: time. It will likely take months to resolve the issues stirred up by the Justice Department, stalling the Carroll case from taking any substantive steps until after the election.

This is how Trump always operates, and it's been amazingly successful. He can often outlast his opponents in legal battles — whether the U.S. Congress, a Manhattan D.A., or an angry contractor he refused to pay — by refusing to ever stop causing trouble. But now, he's has the full force of the federal government to help him.


But on Tuesday, Americans learned that their government's Justice Department is intervening in the case, claiming that the allegations implicate Trump in his official capacity as president. According to the filing, Barr delegated the authority to determine whether a federal employee's actions fall with the scope of their official duties to James G. Touhey, Jr., director of the torts branch. (Though it's hard to believe this kind of action doesn't happen in Barr's Justice Department without his at least implicit approval and support.)

The filing claimed:

Trump’s New Press Secretary Holds First Wacky Briefing

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

New White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany gave her first briefing on Friday, an event she indicated would be one of many going forward. And it went about exactly as well as could be expected.

Which is to say that it was a whirlwind of lies, deception, trumped-up outrage, braggadocio, and deflection.

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#EndorseThis: Colbert Has A Slightly Used Alibi For Alleged Rapist Trump

You may have heard that President Trump again stands accused of brutal misconduct toward women. Writing for New York magazine, author and journalist E. Jean Carroll recalled how Trump raped her in the dressing room of a Manhattan department store in 1996 — and became the 22nd woman to charge him with sexual assault.

“Trump is really repeating his 2016 strategy,” noted Stephen Colbert archly.

In his usual self-pitying style, Trump compared himself to Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was accused of assault and confirmed to the Supreme Court anyway. Which inspired Colbert to concoct his perfect alibi.

It’s yet another appalling episode in the life of our 45th president.

Click and grimace.

Trump Rages At Rape Accuser Carroll — But His Denial Includes An Obvious Lie

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

In a horrifying piece for The Cut, journalist E. Jean Carroll joined the more than a dozen women who have accused President Donald Trump of sexual assault and misconduct. Her story includes one of the worst allegations yet, that Trump forced her against a wall and raped her in a Bergdorf Goodman 23 years ago as she tried to fight him off.

The article already included a denial from the White House, but after the story was published, Trump issued a new statement attacking Carroll. And it included at least one clear lie.

“I’ve never met this person in my life,” the statement said. “She is trying to sell a new book—that should indicate her motivation.”

However, Carroll’s article included a picture, provided by her, showing that she met with Trump at least once in 1987. The image only shows the back of Trump’s head, but it clearly has his distinctive hairstyle; most persuasively, he is standing next to Ivana Trump, his wife at the time.

Trump also said: “I would like to thank Bergdorf Goodman for confirming they have no video footage of any such incident, because it never happened.”

But this misrepresented what Bergdorf Goodman said. The company said they had no video records stored from the time of the event, so they have no way to prove or disprove the allegation.

He also tried to suggest, erroneously, that the Democratic Party is working with Carroll.

There’s good reason to find Carroll’s story credible. New York Magazine got in touch with Carroll’s friends, who confirmed that she told them about the rape contemporaneously.