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Tag: election fraud

Trump Says He'll Pardon Riot Defendants If He Wins In 2024

During an incendiary speech at a Saturday evening rally in Conroe, Texas, former President Donald Trump urged his followers to mount street protests across the country if the federal and state prosecutors currently investigating him and the Trump Organization "do anything illegal."

Denouncing all of those prosecutors as guilty of “prosecutorial misconduct at the highest level,” Trump clearly meant to invite mob action should they issue any indictment of him – a sign of fear and desperation as he faces the likelihood of criminal liability.

"If these radical, vicious, racist prosecutors do anything wrong or illegal, I hope we are going to have in this country the biggest protest we have ever had in Washington DC, in New York, in Atlanta and elsewhere because our country and our elections are corrupt," he said. "In reality, they're not after me, they're after you, and I just happen to be the person in the way.” He repeated the “racist” slur several times in referring to the prosecutors, presumably because two of them – Letitia James in New York and Fani Willis in Atlanta – happen to be Black women and a third, Alvin Bragg in Manhattan, is a Black man.

James is investigating tax fraud and other possible crimes by the Trump Organization, while Willis is investigating Trump's attempt to overturn the 2020 election outcome in Georgia by influencing state officials. He is also facing probes by the US Attorney in the Southern District of New York and the Manhattan District Attorney.

"They're going after me without any protection of my rights by the Supreme Court or most other courts," Trump said. In fact, Trump has employed the services of multiple defense attorneys and has not seen any of his rights violated.

Beyond his dog-whistling call for a violent response, Trump went still further by suggesting he will pardon the hundreds of criminal defendants currently under investigation and prosecution for the January 6 Capitol insurrection. Alluding to his potential presidential candidacy in 2024, Trump said: "If I run and I win, we will treat those people from January 6 fairly….And if it requires pardons, we will give them pardons. Because they are being treated so unfairly."

Trump has played this pardon game before, abusing the power granted in the Constitution to discourage witnesses from cooperating with investigation or prosecution of his alleged crimes. He dangled pardons, successfully, to interfere with the Mueller probe of his campaign’s 2016 collusion with the Kremlin -- and then delivered pardons to the likes of Paul Manafort, Michael Flynn, and Roger Stone.

The nation would have benefitted greatly if Trump had been prosecuted for his corrupt abuses of the pardon power. Having gotten away with it already, he is attempting to run the same crooked game again.

More broadly, he is attempting to intimidate prosecutors and Congressional investigators in the style of a mob boss – threatening mass violence like the riot that he fomented and then failed to curtail on January 6. But his menacing speech was nothing if not a signal of his own consciousness of guilt -- and his own gnawing fear that he will ultimately face justice.

My Pillow Guy Visits White House To Talk 'Martial Law' With Trump

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell arrived at the White House on Friday for an apparent meeting with President Donald Trump, raising alarms after a press photographer shared a close-up shot of the visitor's notes.

While the image wasn't entirely clear — the paper was folded in half, and some of the text was blurry due to the distance at which the photo was taken — it strongly indicated that Lindell planned to bring up with Trump widely debunked conspiracy fictions about the 2020 election. The notes even suggested he would push for personnel changes, the invocation of the Insurrection Act, and the possible declaration of martial law.

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Dominion Warns Powell Legal Action Is 'Imminent' As Employee Files Separate Lawsuit

Dominion Voting Systems CEO John Poulos told Axios his company will be moving forward with a lawsuit against former Trump campaign attorney and conspiracy theorists Sidney Powell Monday.

"We were originally quiet and we sat back as a company," Poulos said. "Because our hope was that all of these claims would be filed in a process in court where procedure and evidence is important. And it's become clear to us that there is absolutely no interest to reveal this evidence because we know it doesn't exist. And there's no effort to actually put it in front of the court proceedings so that these allegations and all of the evidence can follow a proper process and be litigated right to the end."

But now the company will be moving forward with a lawsuit.

Poulos added that the companies focus will be on Powell and not the Trump campaign, as she has been "the most egregious and prolific purveyor of the falsities against Dominion," said the CEO. He also added that though there is no lawsuit yet, one is "imminent."

His statements come on the same day Eric Coomer, a Dominion employee in Colorado, filed a defamation lawsuit against both Powell and the Trump campaign, according to Reuters.

"Defendants, by their actions, have elevated Dr. Coomer into the national spotlight, invaded his privacy, threatened his security, and fundamentally defamed his reputation across this country," the lawsuit said.

Reuters attempted to reach out to the Trump campaign and Sidney Powell, but neither responded.

Powell received a letter from Dominion last month demanding she stops spreading "wild, knowingly baseless and false accusations" about the company's voting machines, according to the New York Times. Specifically, Dominion "demanded that Ms. Powell publicly disavow several false claims she has repeated in the past few weeks. She has maintained, for instance, that Dominion machines and their software were created in Venezuela to help the country's now-deceased former president, Hugo Chavez, win elections," reported The Times.

Dominion insists that they have absolutely no connection to Venezuela, to Hugo Chavez, or "Big Foot or the Loch Ness monster," as the letter notes.

They also demanded that Powell "retract false statements she has made suggesting that the company paid kickbacks to officials in Georgia for 'no-bid contracts' to use its machines and that it manipulated votes in 'an effort to rig the 2020 election," according to the Times. These claims also have no merit.

"The level of falsity has reached a level which I had not previously thought possible," Poulos told Axios.

According to a separate New York Times article, the legal threats by Dominion and its management are serious. Floyd Abrams, one of the country's most prominent First Amendment lawyers, told the Times that the letter Dominion sent to Powell is "extremely powerful." Abrams added, "The repeated accusations against both companies are plainly defamatory and surely have done enormous reputational and financial harm to both."

Latest Trump Lawsuit Demands Court Cancel Georgia Vote

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

Donald Trump filed a lawsuit on New Year's Eve demanding that a federal judge decertify the results of the 2020 presidential election in Georgia, alleging without any evidence that "illegal voting" occurred and therefore the results were invalid.

The suit, filed with the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia against Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in their official capacities, claims the existence of violations of election law that "have resulted in more than 11,779 'illegal' votes to be counted in the State of Georgia which is sufficient to change the outcome of the election or place the outcome in doubt."

President-elect Joe Biden won the state by exactly 11,779 votes.

The lawsuit is similar to dozens of other lawsuits the Trump campaign and Trump's GOP allies have filed since the election. They have lost 60 of those lawsuits, with judges tossing many of them due to a lack of any proof.

Multiple federal fudges have chastised Trump's lawyers and his GOP defenders for filing the lawsuits, accusing them of trying to subvert the will of the voters by getting judges to overturn a free and fair election.

"Voters, not lawyers, choose the president," wrote U.S. Circuit Judge Stephanos Bibas, a Trump appointee, in a decision in November tossing out a Trump campaign lawsuit seeking to overturn election results in Pennsylvania. "Ballots, not briefs, decide elections."

Ballots in Georgia have been counted three times, each time with the same conclusion: Biden defeated Trump in the state.

Nevertheless, Trump is still trying to overturn the state's result, even though if Georgia's 16 Electoral College votes were removed from Biden's column, Biden would still have 290, more than the 270 needed to win.

Trump is continuing to go to extraordinary lengths to overturn the will of the voters in Georgia.

He called Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger on Saturday to demand that Raffensperger "find" just enough votes to make Trump the winner in the state.

The phone call could lead to criminal charges against Trump, as experts say it's a violation of both state and federal election law to engage in a conspiracy to commit election fraud.

Georgia has already certified its election results; the electors in the state cast their ballots on Dec. 14; and the election is over. What's more, the so-called safe harbor deadline to resolve disputes about the election results in the courts passed on Dec. 8.

The last step in the process is for Congress to certify the results of the Electoral College vote, which it is scheduled to do on Wednesday. More than 140 Republican lawmakers plan to object to the certification, but their stunt will fail, as the Democratic-controlled House will not vote to overturn Biden's win.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Ted Cruz And At Least Ten More GOP Senators Challenging Electoral College Vote

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

As January 6 approaches, more Republican lawmakers are joining the Trump bandwagon to challenge the Electoral College vote despite having no substantial evidence of widespread voter fraud to suggest the presidential election was rigged.

On Saturday, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) along with Sens. Ron Johnson (R-WI), James Lankford (R-OK), Steve Daines (R-MT), John Kennedy (R-LA), Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), and Mike Braun (R-IN), and Senators-Elect Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), Roger Marshall (R-KS), Bill Hagerty (R-TN), and Tommy Tuberville (R-AL) released a statement just days ahead of the Electoral College certification process.

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Poll: Striking Number Of Americans Believe Baseless Conspiracy Theories

A scary percentage of our neighbors believe in next-level crazy conspiracy theories.

According to a new NPR/Ipsos poll, forty percent of Americans believe the wild claim that Covid-19 was produced in a Chinese lab, despite science and evidence disproving this. One-third of people believe that election fraud is the reason that President-elect Joe Biden won the 2020 election, again with no proof.

Chris Jackson, a pollster with Ipsos, told NPR that "increasingly, people are willing to say and believe stuff that fits in with their view of how the world should be, even if it doesn't have any basis in reality or fact."

"It's total bonkers," Jackson continued, "and yet ... essentially half of Americans believe it's true or think that maybe it's true. They don't really know. And I think that's terrifying that half of Americans believe that could be the case."

Looking specifically at election conspiracy theories, evidence disproving it goes across the political aisle. Trump's long-time Attorney General and right-hand man William Barr said that there is no evidence of election fraud. And investigators in Georgia found no fraudulent absentee ballots after a thorough audit, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Trump's own Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) took it a step further, saying, "The November 3rd election was the most secure in American history," in a statement. Which lead to the firing of now-former CISA Director Christopher Krebs.

"Conspiracy theories have most often flourished during times of great sociopolitical upheaval and uncertainty," says a November Vox article.

With Covid-19 ravaging communities across America, this is almost as uncertain as it gets. So, QAnon conspiracy theorists take comfort in what Trump says because it's painless. It's easier to make up excuses and lies than to face your party losing an election or that there is a dangerous virus killing thousands of Americans. And with the internet, spreading conspiracies is easier than ever, according to Vox.

People are also achieving wealth and social media fame from conspiracy theories:: "Alex Jones, the host of the alarmist far-right show Infowars, is perhaps the most successful, visible example of someone building an empire out of peddling conspiracy theories — the more absurd, the better. But he's not alone. Conspiracy theories flourish on TikTok, Facebook, and YouTube (which has long fought a battle against those who spread them) not just because individual theories go viral, but because their creators can become hugely influential," according to Vox. "There's no hard evidence that conspiracy theories are circulating more widely today than ever before. But over the past five years, it has certainly seemed like average Americans have bought into them more and more."

Congressional Republicans Feuding Over Trump’s Election Fraud ’Scam’

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Far-right Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama has joined President Donald Trump in refusing to acknowledge Joe Biden as president-elect and pushing debunked claims of voter fraud. But another Republican, Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is slamming Brooks' voter fraud claims as nonsense, sparking a feud between the two GOP congressmen.

Kinzinger, according to Newsweek's Jason Lemon, "has suggested that those backing the president's conspiracy theories are doing so to raise money and garner more attention on social media" — and Kinzinger has dismissed the voter fraud claims as a "scam."


When Brooks appeared on Fox News' Fox and Friends on Monday morning, he accused the Illinois Republican of being soft on voter fraud.

"If he would do his homework," Brooks told the Fox and Friends hosts, "he would understand the evidence is overwhelming. He can either surrender to the people who support voter fraud, election theft — or he can fight for his country on this particular issue."

In truth, the wild claims Trump and his allies have pushed to back up the assertion that the election was stolen have been repeatedly debunked.

Brooks, on "Fox and Friends," claimed that "dozens" of House Republicans might join him in objecting to the Electoral College results when Congress meets for a joint session on January 6.

"There are dozens in the House of Representatives who have reached that conclusion, as I have. We're going to sponsor and co-sponsor objections to the Electoral College vote returns of Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Arizona, Nevada and maybe more depending on where we collectively want to go," the Alabama lawmaker said.

Lemon, however, notes, "In order for the objections to be considered, a Republican senator must also sign on to a written objection. Although the effort is widely expected to fail, several GOP senators have suggested they may be open to supporting objections."

Kinzinger, in contrast to Brooks, acknowledges Biden as the United States' legitimate president-elect and has said that there is no proof of the type of widespread voter fraud that Brooks alleges. Appearing on CNN's State of the Union on Sunday, Kinzinger stressed, "I grew up as a Republican because I believe in smaller government and strong national defense, and that's being destroyed by conspiracies right now and anger. I really do worry about the future of my party."

Slamming Kinzinger on Twitter, Brooks tweeted:


Kinzinger tweeted in response:


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has acknowledged Biden as president-elect and Sen. Kamala Harris as vice president-elect, has been trying to discourage Senate Republicans from joining House Republicans in objecting to the Electoral College results. Sen. John Thune of South Dakota is siding with McConnell, saying that objections are likely to go down like a "shot dog." And Trump, in response, is attacking Thune as a RINO or Republican in Name Only:


The vote count for this year's presidential election showed Biden with 306 electoral votes, and he defeated Trump by more than 7 million in the popular vote.

Nevada Data Expert Debunks Trump’s Election Fraud Claims

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Nevada is among the battleground states where supporters of President Donald Trump have concocted a narrative that President-elect Joe Biden's victory was due to widespread fraud. In the hope of making their case, Trump supporters asked Rex Briggs — a Nevada resident who specializes in data analysis — to investigate that state's election returns.

But when Briggs conducted an investigation as they requested, their claims fell apart. He ended up debunking their arguments, rather than finding proof for them. This should be no surprise, of course. Not only are the pro-Trump claims of election fraud made without credible evidence, but they're also made so wildly and out of proportion with reality that there's no indication the people making such allegations care about the truth at all.

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