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My Pillow Guy Visits White House To Talk 'Martial Law' With Trump

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell arrived at the White House on Friday for an apparent meeting with President Donald Trump, raising alarms after a press photographer shared a close-up shot of the visitor's notes.

While the image wasn't entirely clear — the paper was folded in half, and some of the text was blurry due to the distance at which the photo was taken — it strongly indicated that Lindell planned to bring up with Trump widely debunked conspiracy fictions about the 2020 election. The notes even suggested he would push for personnel changes, the invocation of the Insurrection Act, and the possible declaration of martial law.

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Dominion Warns Powell Legal Action Is 'Imminent' As Employee Files Separate Lawsuit

Dominion Voting Systems CEO John Poulos told Axios his company will be moving forward with a lawsuit against former Trump campaign attorney and conspiracy theorists Sidney Powell Monday.

"We were originally quiet and we sat back as a company," Poulos said. "Because our hope was that all of these claims would be filed in a process in court where procedure and evidence is important. And it's become clear to us that there is absolutely no interest to reveal this evidence because we know it doesn't exist. And there's no effort to actually put it in front of the court proceedings so that these allegations and all of the evidence can follow a proper process and be litigated right to the end."

But now the company will be moving forward with a lawsuit.

Poulos added that the companies focus will be on Powell and not the Trump campaign, as she has been "the most egregious and prolific purveyor of the falsities against Dominion," said the CEO. He also added that though there is no lawsuit yet, one is "imminent."

His statements come on the same day Eric Coomer, a Dominion employee in Colorado, filed a defamation lawsuit against both Powell and the Trump campaign, according to Reuters.

"Defendants, by their actions, have elevated Dr. Coomer into the national spotlight, invaded his privacy, threatened his security, and fundamentally defamed his reputation across this country," the lawsuit said.

Reuters attempted to reach out to the Trump campaign and Sidney Powell, but neither responded.

Powell received a letter from Dominion last month demanding she stops spreading "wild, knowingly baseless and false accusations" about the company's voting machines, according to the New York Times. Specifically, Dominion "demanded that Ms. Powell publicly disavow several false claims she has repeated in the past few weeks. She has maintained, for instance, that Dominion machines and their software were created in Venezuela to help the country's now-deceased former president, Hugo Chavez, win elections," reported The Times.

Dominion insists that they have absolutely no connection to Venezuela, to Hugo Chavez, or "Big Foot or the Loch Ness monster," as the letter notes.

They also demanded that Powell "retract false statements she has made suggesting that the company paid kickbacks to officials in Georgia for 'no-bid contracts' to use its machines and that it manipulated votes in 'an effort to rig the 2020 election," according to the Times. These claims also have no merit.

"The level of falsity has reached a level which I had not previously thought possible," Poulos told Axios.

According to a separate New York Times article, the legal threats by Dominion and its management are serious. Floyd Abrams, one of the country's most prominent First Amendment lawyers, told the Times that the letter Dominion sent to Powell is "extremely powerful." Abrams added, "The repeated accusations against both companies are plainly defamatory and surely have done enormous reputational and financial harm to both."

Latest Trump Lawsuit Demands Court Cancel Georgia Vote

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

Donald Trump filed a lawsuit on New Year's Eve demanding that a federal judge decertify the results of the 2020 presidential election in Georgia, alleging without any evidence that "illegal voting" occurred and therefore the results were invalid.

The suit, filed with the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia against Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger in their official capacities, claims the existence of violations of election law that "have resulted in more than 11,779 'illegal' votes to be counted in the State of Georgia which is sufficient to change the outcome of the election or place the outcome in doubt."

President-elect Joe Biden won the state by exactly 11,779 votes.

The lawsuit is similar to dozens of other lawsuits the Trump campaign and Trump's GOP allies have filed since the election. They have lost 60 of those lawsuits, with judges tossing many of them due to a lack of any proof.

Multiple federal fudges have chastised Trump's lawyers and his GOP defenders for filing the lawsuits, accusing them of trying to subvert the will of the voters by getting judges to overturn a free and fair election.

"Voters, not lawyers, choose the president," wrote U.S. Circuit Judge Stephanos Bibas, a Trump appointee, in a decision in November tossing out a Trump campaign lawsuit seeking to overturn election results in Pennsylvania. "Ballots, not briefs, decide elections."

Ballots in Georgia have been counted three times, each time with the same conclusion: Biden defeated Trump in the state.

Nevertheless, Trump is still trying to overturn the state's result, even though if Georgia's 16 Electoral College votes were removed from Biden's column, Biden would still have 290, more than the 270 needed to win.

Trump is continuing to go to extraordinary lengths to overturn the will of the voters in Georgia.

He called Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger on Saturday to demand that Raffensperger "find" just enough votes to make Trump the winner in the state.

The phone call could lead to criminal charges against Trump, as experts say it's a violation of both state and federal election law to engage in a conspiracy to commit election fraud.

Georgia has already certified its election results; the electors in the state cast their ballots on Dec. 14; and the election is over. What's more, the so-called safe harbor deadline to resolve disputes about the election results in the courts passed on Dec. 8.

The last step in the process is for Congress to certify the results of the Electoral College vote, which it is scheduled to do on Wednesday. More than 140 Republican lawmakers plan to object to the certification, but their stunt will fail, as the Democratic-controlled House will not vote to overturn Biden's win.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Tape Reveals Trump Pressured Georgia Official To 'Recalculate' Vote In His Favor

On Saturday Donald Trump urged Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to "find votes" and help him overturn the state's presidential election results in a stunning hour-long phone call that was taped. Unfortunately for Trump,The Washington Post. obtained and published the tape on Sunday.

The shocking development occured as Trump continues to seek avenues to block certification of the election by Congress so that he can somehow retain power.

The Post reports that Trump "alternately berated Raffensperger, tried to flatter him, begged him to act and threatened him with vague criminal consequences if the secretary of state refused to pursue his false claims."



With White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, Trump lawyer Cleta Mitchell, other Trump associates, and Georgia state attorney Ryan Germany on the line, Trump told the state official to announce publicly that he had "recalculated" the November vote -- a clear demand to commit election fraud. (Any such demand or "solicitation" is a felony in the state of Georgia.)

Supported by his counsel Germany, Raffensperger consistently rejected a series of outlandish claims by Trump about fraudulent ballots and tampered Dominion Voting Systems machines.

"The people of Georgia are angry, the people of the country are angry," Trump told him on the tape. "And there's nothing wrong with saying, you know, that you've recalculated."

Raffensperger retorted: "Well, Mr. President, the challenge that you have is, the data you have is wrong."

At another moment Trump said: "So look. All I want to do is this. I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have. Because we won the state." Although Trump insistently blustered that he had won the state by "hundreds of thousands of votes," he later adopted a wheedling tone: "So what are we going to do here, folks? I only need 11,000 votes. Fellas, I need 11,000 votes. Give me a break."

But the president threatened Raffensperger more than once, warning that he and his counsel would be committing a "criminal offense"and taking "a big risk" if they failed to endorse Trump's false claims. Neither Meadows nor Mitchell uttered any objection to Trump's unlawful demands, and in fact Meadows chimed in with a suggestion that Raffensperger "cooperate" with the president.

"So what are we going to do here, folks? I only need 11,000 votes. Fellas, I need 11,000 votes. Give me a break."

Like Trump's infamous call to the Ukrainian president last year, this brazen attempt to force a public official to falsify election results is not just a crime -- actually a series of crimes -- but an impeachable act. There just isn't enough time left in Trump's term to impeach him again. But now every Republican who backs Trump's "election fraud" campaign knows exactly how hollow, fraudulent, and fascistic it is.