Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Tag:

Here’s How To Protect All The Wi-Fi Connected Devices In Your Home From Hackers

The news continues to prove that no one is safe from cyber attacks, and Congress’ recent decision to allow ISPs to sell browsing data without customer consent only adds to privacy fears. If Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump aren’t immune, how can your home network be safe?

You can take a step toward tightening the net around your entire home protection system with CUJO Smart Internet Security Firewall, on sale right now in The National Memo Store for only $224.99, an almost $25 savings.

Connect CUJO to your home WiFi network, and you’ll protect even more than is possible with a VPN. CUJO acts like a bloodhound, sniffing out smart devices all over your house, assessing their vulnerabilities and patching any holes in their security to keep your network free of hackers and malware.

With a VPN, protection is limited to just computers and smartphones. CUJO goes far beyond that. Whether it’s a laptop, smartphone, TV, baby monitor or even smart light or thermostat, CUJO uses machine learning to track how the device usually operates, and protect every corner of your data.

CUJO is your cyber-watchdog, guarding your entire home from virtual threats before crooks or snoops can get a fingerhold in your network. With this offer lasts, you can pick up a CUJO to protect your home for almost 10% off.

This sponsored post is brought to you by StackCommerce

Senior Democrat: ‘No Doubt’ Russia Behind Hacks On U.S. Election Systems

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A senior Democratic lawmaker said Sunday he had “no doubt” that Russia was behind recent hacking attempts targeting state election systems, and urged the Obama administration to publicly blame Moscow for trying to undermine confidence in the Nov. 8 presidential contest.

The remarks from Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), the top Democrat on the intelligence committee in the U.S. House of Representatives, come amid heightened concerns among U.S. and state officials about the security of voting machines and databases, and unsubstantiated allegations from Republican candidate Donald Trump that the election could be “rigged.”

“I have no doubt [this is Russia]. And I don’t think the administration has any doubt,” Schiff said during an appearance on ABC’s This Week.

Schiff’s call to name and shame the Kremlin came a week after Trump questioned widely held conclusions made privately by the U.S. intelligence community that Russia is responsible for the hacking activity.

“It could be Russia, but it could also be China,” Trump said during a televised debate with Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. “It also could be somebody sitting on their bed that weighs 400 pounds.”

On Saturday, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said hackers have probed the voting systems of many U.S. states but there is no sign that they have manipulated any voting data.

Schiff said he doubted hackers could falsify vote tallies in a way to affect the election outcome. Officials and experts have said the decentralized and outdated nature of U.S. voting technology makes such hacks more unlikely.

But cyber attacks on voter registration systems could “sow discord” on election day, Schiff said. He further added that leaks of doctored emails would be difficult to disprove and could “be election altering.”

The National Security Agency, FBI and DHS all concluded weeks ago that Russian intelligence agencies conducted, directed or coordinated all the major cyberattacks on U.S. political organizations, including the Democratic National Committee, and individuals, a U.S. official who is participating in the investigations said on Sunday.

However, the official said, White House officials have resisted naming the Russians publicly because doing so could result in escalating cyberattacks, and because it is considered impossible to offer public, unclassified proof of the allegation.

Schiff and Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), the top Democrat on the U.S. Senate intelligence committee, said last month they had concluded Russian intelligence agencies were “making a serious and concerted effort to influence the U.S. election.”

(Reporting by Dustin Volz and John Walcott; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Owner Of Ashley Madison Website Confirms Some Authentic Data Leaked

TORONTO (Reuters) – Avid Life Media, the company behind infidelity website AshleyMadison.com, confirmed on Wednesday that some legitimate data has been stolen from it and published online, but said it has never stored credit card information on its servers.

Hackers dumped a massive cache of data about Ashley Madison users online late on Tuesday, posting it on a part of the Internet that is only accessible by using a specialized browser.

Lists of email addresses quickly popped up in more accessible parts of the Web, threatening to wreak havoc on relationships across the globe.

The release of the information came a month after a breach of Ashley Madison security was first reported, and after Toronto-based Avid Life ignored hackers’ demands to shut down both the Ashley Madison site and another site called Established Men, which pairs older men with young women.

“There has been a substantial amount of postings since the initial posting, the vast majority of which have contained data unrelated to AshleyMadison.com but there has also been some data released that is legitimate,” Avid Life spokesman Paul Keable said in an email.

“Furthermore, we can confirm that we do not – nor ever have – store credit card information on our servers,” he said.

Several security experts have said that people they know, who are Ashley Madison members, have found their names in the leaked data, with partial credit card details attached.

(Reporting by Alastair Sharp; Editing by Peter Galloway)

Image: The homepage of the Ashley Madison website is displayed on an iPad, in this photo illustration taken in Ottawa, Canada July 21, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Sony Cancels December 25 Release Of North Korea Parody Film

Los Angeles (AFP) – Sony Pictures on Wednesday canceled the December 25 release date of The Interview, a parody film which has angered North Korea and triggered chilling threats from hackers.

“In light of the decision by the majority of our (theater) exhibitors not to show the film The Interview, we have decided not to move forward with the… theatrical release,” it said in a statement.

AFP Photo