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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Connie Schultz writes that it’s time for Newt Gingrich to give a real response to charges of hypocrisy, in her column, “Answer The Question, Candidate Gingrich:

You may have noticed that most of the presidential debates are moderated by men, which gives female journalists like me lots of time to watch and listen.

Land of plenty, that is. So many opportunities to turn to my dog on the couch and say, “Wait. What?”

Take CNN anchorman John King’s exchange last week with Newt Gingrich. King kinda, sorta asked the candidate to respond to an accusation from his second wife.

King: “As you know, your ex-wife gave an interview to ABC News and another interview with The Washington Post. And this story has now gone viral on the Internet. In it, she says that you came to her in 1999, at a time when you were having an affair. She says you asked her, sir, to enter into an open marriage. Would you like to take some time to respond to that?”

Gingrich: “No, but I will.”

Let’s back up for a moment. About this open-marriage thing. I’ve consulted with a number of my married female friends, and the consensus is that “open marriage” means the husband gets to have sex with the new girl while the wife keeps a-cookin’ and a-cleanin’ on the homestead. ‘Cause she’s just that grateful to be the missis, you understand.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Screenshot Youtube

Just over year before her untimely death on Friday, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared as a guest lecturer for the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, AR with National Public Radio correspondent Nina Totenberg. The crowd that signed up to see "Notorious RBG" live was so large that the event had to be moved to a major sports arena – and they weren't disappointed by the wide-ranging, hour-long interview.

Witty, charming, brilliant, principled, Ginsburg represented the very best of American liberalism and modern feminism. Listen to her and you'll feel even more deeply what former President Bill Clinton says in his poignant introduction: "Only one of us in this room appointed her…but all of us hope that she will stay on that court forever."