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Donald Trump hosted former Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher at a party at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida over the weekend.

Gallagher was accused of war crimes previously and was convicted in July this year for posing with the corpse of an enemy combatant while serving.

The former SEAL and his wife posted an Instagram photo of themselves speaking to Trump and first lady Melania Trump at the event over the weekend.

“Finally got to thank the President and his amazing wife by giving them a little gift from Eddie’s deployment to Mosul,” they wrote.

Trump pardoned Gallagher in November, ignoring recommendations from military leaders, including then-Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer. Gallagher was convicted of posing for a photo with a dead teenager’s body in Iraq. He was acquitted of several other charges, including allegedly shooting civilians and threatening to kill SEALs who reported him for his conduct.

Trump’s decision came after several hosts on Fox News repeatedly pushed on-air for Gallagher’s crime to go unpunished.

Trump has often turned to Fox News for advice on key issues, and several of the network’s hosts, including conservatives Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson, are some of his key unofficial advisers.

Gallagher had been slated for demotion after his conviction and the Navy planned to remove his Trident pin, which denotes his status as a SEAL. Instead, Trump vetoed the demotion and allowed Gallagher to keep his pin.

Trump forced Spencer to resign from his position after he objected to Trump’s actions in defense of the disgraced former serviceman.

“I cannot in good conscience obey an order that I believe violates the sacred oath I took in the presence of my family, my flag and my faith to support and defend the Constitution of the United States,” Spencer wrote in his resignation letter.

Spencer also noted that “good order” is necessary to protect the lives of sailors, marines, and civilians involved in military operations and that the pardon ran contrary to that need.

“The rule of law is what sets us apart from our adversaries,” Spencer wrote.

Trump also appeared on stage earlier in the month at a Republican fundraiser alongside two other service members who have been accused of war crimes and were pardoned by him.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.